Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Rows in a PivotTable.

Rows in a PivotTable

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 22, 2014)

When working with PivotTables, you may have a need to determine how many rows the PivotTable contains. There are a couple of ways you can go about this. If you want to use a worksheet formula, you can create a formula that will return the count of cells.

The first thing you need to do is to determine which column of your PivotTable you want to count. For the sake of this example, let's say that you want to count column C. Display the New Name dialog box and specify a name for your data in the Name field. In the Refers To field enter the following formula:

=OFFSET($C$1,0,0,COUNTA($C:$C,1))

Click OK, and you have given a name to a range of data defined by the formula. Assuming that the name you used was PTRows, you could then use the following formula in a regular cell:

=ROWS(PTRows)

What is returned is the count of the rows in the data range, which represents your PivotTable.

If you want to determine the row count in a macro, the following line will assign the value to the lRowCount variable:

lRowCount = ActiveSheet.PivotTables("Pivottable1").TableRange2.Rows.Count

This code returns a count of all the rows in the PivotTable, including the page fields. If you want to omit the page fields and just return the count of the rows in the main PivotTable, you can use this code instead:

lRowCount = ActiveSheet.PivotTables("Pivottable1").TableRange1.Rows.Count

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (8561) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Rows in a PivotTable.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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