Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Saving All Open Workbooks.

Saving All Open Workbooks

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 23, 2018)

If you work with lots of workbooks open at the same time, you know that it can be a pain to go through and save each of the open workbooks, in turn. Wouldn't it be great to have a single command that allowed you to save all the open workbooks, without the need to do it manually?

Unfortunately, there isn't such a command. The closest solution is to hold down the Shift key as you click the File menu, then choose Close All. In the process of closing, Excel will ask if you want each workbook saved.

The big drawback to this is that Excel closes and you need to again start Excel and open all your workbooks. If you want a true Save All command, you need to create it using a macro. The following is a good example of one you could use:

Sub SaveAll()
    Dim Wkb As Workbook
    For Each Wkb In Workbooks
        If Not Wkb.ReadOnly And Windows(Wkb.Name).Visible Then
            Wkb.Save
        End If
    Next
End Sub

Save the macro in your Personal workbook, assign it to a toolbar button or a shortcut key, and you can call it up as often as you like. It saves all the workbooks that are open, except those that are read-only or hidden.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3307) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Saving All Open Workbooks.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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