Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Documenting Changes in VBA Code.

Documenting Changes in VBA Code

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 25, 2015)

Phil is a member of his bank's MIS department. The department creates a lot of management reports using Excel. In doing so they write a lot of macros to automate the reports as much as possible. Because of the Sarbanes-Oxley act the bank is required to track changes to the VBA code. Phil wonders if there are any products or methods to track the changes in the VBA code that would highlight what was changed and then preserve those changes for documentation purposes.

The easiest way to do this would be to periodically export the macro code to a text file, and then archive the text files. This could be done every day, week, month, etc., or it could be done anytime there is a change in the code. Simply give each text file a different descriptive name so you can tell which version the file contains.

Once in text-file format, the files can be easily compared against one another to highlight differences; there are any number of commercial products that could be used for comparing the text files. (You could even use Microsoft Word to compare different versions of files.)

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3808) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Documenting Changes in VBA Code.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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