Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Selecting Formulas.

Selecting Formulas

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 21, 2016)

Excel allows you to quickly select all the formulas in a worksheet. You may want to do this in preparation for applying formatting, or for some other purpose. To select all your formulas, follow these steps:

  1. Press F5. Excel displays the Go To dialog box.
  2. Click on Special. Excel displays the Go To Special dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Go To Special dialog box.

  4. Choose the Formulas radio button.
  5. Using the four check boxes under the Formulas radio button, indicate the type of results that should be produced by the formulas you want selected.
  6. Click on OK.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2741) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Selecting Formulas.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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