Unlocking Charts

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 18, 2014)

A common task done in macros is to lock and unlock different cells and objects in a workbook. This is often done for protection reasons, so that things cannot be modified inadvertently by users. If you need to unlock the charts that are in your workbook, you can easily do so if you remember that even though charts can be considered drawing objects, you don't unlock them as drawing objects--you specifically unlock the chart object.

In addition, how you unlock a chart depends on whether it is a Chart sheet or a Chart object on a regular worksheet. The following code, named ChartUnProtect, provides an example of how to successfully unprotect both types of charts.

Sub ChartUnProtect()
    Dim wks As Worksheet
    Dim cht As Chart
    Dim chtObj As ChartObject
    Dim PW As String
    PW = "mypass"

    'Unprotect all Chart sheets
    For Each cht In ActiveWorkbook.Charts
        Sheets(cht.Name).Unprotect password:=PW
    Next

    'Unlock all Chart objects on each worksheet
    For Each wks In ActiveWorkbook.Worksheets
        wks.Unprotect password:=PW
        For Each chtObj In wks.ChartObjects
            wks.DrawingObjects(chtObj.Name).Locked = False
        Next
        wks.Protect password:=PW
    Next
End Sub

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2264) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Drop Shadows for Tables

When adding borders and shading to a document's elements, Word allows you to quickly add drop shadows to paragraphs, text ...

Discover More

Printing a Bookmark List

Need to know what bookmarks are defined in a document? Here's a macro that creates a list of all your bookmarks so that you ...

Discover More

Returning to Your Document after Adding an Endnote

Endnotes are a required element in some types of writing. When you add an endnote, Word moves you to the end of your document ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Deleting a Chart

Charts serve a purpose, and sometimes that purpose is temporary. If you want to get rid of a chart, here's how to do it.

Discover More

Converting Charts to GIF Files

You spent a lot of time getting your chart to look just the way you wanted. Now you want to create a graphic file from that ...

Discover More

Identifying Scatter Plot Points

Do you want to add data labels to the data points in an xy graph? Excel doesn't provide a way to get the desired labels, but ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 4 + 3?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.