Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Renaming a Macro.

Renaming a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 5, 2013)

A macro is nothing more than a series of instructions you want the computer to execute. It is a program which is run in the context of the application you are using. As you create macros, you will probably come across a need to rename a few of the existing macros. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Press Alt+F8 to display the Macros dialog box.
  2. From the list of macros displayed, select the one you want to rename.
  3. Click on Edit. The VBA Editor is displayed, with the code for the selected macro visible.
  4. At the top of the macro is the keyword "Sub" followed by the macro name, then a pair of parentheses.
  5. Change the macro name as desired, but leave "Sub" there, as well as the parentheses.
  6. Close the VBA Editor.

Remember that if you rename a macro, you may need to make other changes, as well. For instance, if you have the macro referenced (called) from a different macro, you'll need to change that other macro to reflect the name as you just changed it. If the macro is also referenced in toolbar buttons or in menus, you'll need to make changes in those to reflect the new name, as well.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2924) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Renaming a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Using Dot Leaders in Special Tables

Adding dot leaders before page numbers in a table of contents or table of authorities can make the finished table look ...

Discover More

Problem with Menus Crashing Word

What do you do if, one day, one of your Word menus suddenly stops working and actually crashes the program? Here's the ...

Discover More

Merging Custom Dictionaries

It is possible to develop a custom dictionary on your computer that reflects the types of documents with which you work most ...

Discover More

Save Time and Supercharge Excel! Automate virtually any routine task and save yourself hours, days, maybe even weeks. Then, learn how to make Excel do things you thought were simply impossible! Mastering advanced Excel macros has never been easier. Check out Excel 2010 VBA and Macros today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

Making Common Functions Available to Others

When you use macros to create functions, you might want to share those functions with others—particularly if they ...

Discover More

Setting Row Height in a Macro

Macros can be used to change the formatting of your worksheet, if desired. One change you might want to make is to the height ...

Discover More

Determining Mouse Cursor Coordinates On a Graphic

Add a graphic to a worksheet as part of an Image object, and you can use some very handy event handlers to figure out the ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share