Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Changing Line Color in a Drawing Object.

Changing Line Color in a Drawing Object

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 3, 2013)

Lines are used for all graphics within Excel. Lines are typically used to outline the shape, although you can use them for arrows and for drawing directly on your worksheet. Excel allows you to specify the color or pattern that should be used for your lines. To change the line color used in an object, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure the Drawing toolbar is displayed.
  2. Click once on the object whose line color you want to change. The object is selected.
  3. Click on the Line Color tool on the Drawing toolbar. The color of the lines in the object are changed to the color used in the bar at the bottom of the Line Color tool.
  4. To use a different color, click on the down-arrow to the right of the tool and choose a different color.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2451) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Changing Line Color in a Drawing Object.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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