Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Deleting a File in a Macro.

Deleting a File in a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 18, 2022)

Sometimes you may use a macro to create temporary files which you later need to delete. Similarly, you may need to just delete a file within a macro. You can accomplish this task using the Kill command. This is a holdover from other versions of BASIC. The syntax is:

Kill File

where File is the full path and file name of the file you want to delete. When you delete a file in this manner, the file is not moved to the Windows Recycle bin; instead, it is immediately deleted from your drive.

If desired, you can also use wildcard characters in the File specification. For instance, if you wanted to delete all the files in the current directory that end in the TMP extension, you could use a command like this:

Kill "*.tmp"

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2450) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Deleting a File in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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