Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Editing a Hyperlink.

Editing a Hyperlink

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 23, 2012)

Once a hyperlink is placed in your worksheet, it is not unusual to periodically need to change the link in some way. This is quite easy to do, using any of the following methods:

  • Select the cell that contains the hyperlink and then click the Insert Hyperlink tool on the toolbar.
  • Select the cell that contains the hyperlink, and then click Insert Hyperlink from the Insert menu.
  • Right-click on the hyperlink, choose Hyperlink from the Context menu, and then choose Edit Hyperlink.

To select a cell in which a hyperlink is located, simply click on an adjacent cell (one without a hyperlink) and use the arrow keys to select the cell. If you try to click on the cell directly, you will instead activate the hyperlink.

At the conclusion of any of these steps, the Edit Hyperlink dialog box is visible. The difference between this instance and actually adding a hyperlink is that all the information in the dialog box is already filled in. You can make edits to your heart's content, and then click on OK to save your changes.

While pulling up the Edit Hyperlink dialog box provides the most flexibility (you can change everything about the link in one place), it can be a pain to do. If all you want to do is change the text used for the hyperlink, Excel makes the process very easy. Simply change the contents of the cell, and the hyperlink text is automatically changed. Thus, you can select the cell containing the hyperlink and begin typing. What you type becomes the text for the hyperlink.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2139) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Editing a Hyperlink.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Getting a Proper Total Page Count

Word allows you to insert dynamic page numbers within your document. With some page number formatting, though, it is ...

Discover More

Erasing Table Lines

When creating tables, Word provides a handy tool that you can use. Once the table is in place, you can use the table eraser ...

Discover More

Performing Complex Sorts

One way you can easily work with data in a worksheet is to sort it into whatever order you find most helpful. Excel allows ...

Discover More

Program Successfully in Excel! John Walkenbach's name is synonymous with excellence in deciphering complex technical topics. With this comprehensive guide, "Mr. Spreadsheet" shows how to maximize your Excel experience using professional spreadsheet application development tips from his own personal bookshelf. Check out Excel 2013 Power Programming with VBA today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

Extracting Hyperlink Information

In Excel, a hyperlink consists of two parts: the text displayed for the link and the target of the link. You can use a macro ...

Discover More

Dynamic Hyperlinks in Excel

Hyperlinks to many types of Web sites rely on passing parameters in the URL. Knowing this, you can construct a dynamic ...

Discover More

Adding a ScreenTip

If you want people to know something about a hyperlink you added to your worksheet, one way to help them is to use ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share