Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Shortcut to Move between Two Worksheets.

Shortcut to Move between Two Worksheets

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 6, 2015)

You can easily move between worksheets in a workbook by using Ctrl+Pg Up and Ctrl+Pg Down. What if you want to use a shortcut to move between two specific, non-neighboring worksheets, such as Sheet1 and Sheet4? In this case, it is best to use a macro to do the jumping around.

If desired, you could define two macros that would do the jumping. One macro would jump to Sheet1 and the other to Sheet4. These would be easy enough to create using the macro recorder, and you could assign a shortcut key to each of the macros.

If you are looking for a single shortcut that will toggle between the two worksheets, then you can use a macro such as this:

Sub JumpBetween1()
    If ActiveSheet.Name = "Sheet1" Then
        Worksheets("Sheet4").Activate
    Else
        Worksheets("Sheet1").Activate
    End If
End Sub

The macro simply checks to see which worksheet is currently displayed. If it is Sheet1, then Sheet4 is displayed. In all other instances, Sheet1 is displayed. This is handy, but it means that if you currently have Sheet2 displayed, the shortcut will always display Sheet1. You might not want the macro to do anything unless either Sheet1 or Sheet4 is displayed. In that case, you should use this variation of the macro:

Sub JumpBetween2()
    If ActiveSheet.Name = "Sheet1" Then
        Sheets("Sheet4").Activate
    ElseIf ActiveSheet.Name = "Sheet4" Then
        Sheets("Sheet1").Activate
    End If
End Sub

Note that the only difference between the two macros is that the latter variation uses ElseIf to check if Sheet4 is displayed. This means that if any worksheets other than Sheet1 or Sheet4 is displayed, the macro will do nothing.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3216) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Shortcut to Move between Two Worksheets.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Improper Index Page Numbers

Adding an index to a document can be a nice finishing touch, particularly if the document is a long one. What happens if the ...

Discover More

Single-Character Fractions

Some fractions Word automatically converts to single characters, some it doesn't. Here's why that happens and what you can do ...

Discover More

Differences between Deleting, Clearing, and Cutting

When getting rid of text from your document, Word allows you to delete, clear, or cut. Here are the differences between these ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

Synchronized Workbook and Worksheet Names

When you work on older workbooks in Excel, you may notice that the name of the worksheet tab and the workbook itself are the ...

Discover More

Unbreakable Formula References to Worksheets

Excel allows you, in your formulas, to include references to cells on other worksheets. Those references include the name of ...

Discover More

Combining Worksheets from Many Workbooks

Do you need to pull a particular worksheet out of a group of workbooks and combine those worksheets into a different ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share