Writing a Macro from Scratch

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 14, 2015)

Many of the tips used in ExcelTips rely upon macros in order to run. Some readers may not know how to enter a macro from scratch in Excel. There are actually two ways you can create macros. First you can record a macro, which is appropriate when you want to record a series of steps you perform quite often. The second method of creating a macro, writing one from scratch, is much more powerful. To create a macro from scratch, follow these steps:

  1. Choose the Macro option from the Tools menu, then choose Macros from the resulting submenu. Excel displays the Macro dialog box.
  2. In the Macros In box (at the bottom of the dialog box), select where you want your new macro stored.
  3. In the Macro Name box, type a descriptive name you want assigned to the macro you are writing.
  4. Click on Create. Visual Basic for Applications will start up and you can write your macro. (You can also paste macro code from other sources, such as ExcelTips.)
  5. When you are through, close the macro window by selecting the Close and Return to Microsoft Excel option from the File menu, or press Alt+Q.

If you are still using Excel 95, the easiest way to create a macro from scratch is to first record a "dummy" macro, and then edit that macro to create your final "from scratch" macro.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2712) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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