Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Opening a Workbook but Disabling Macros.

Opening a Workbook but Disabling Macros

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 28, 2015)

Bob is processing information in a workbook by using a macro. He would like for the macro to open a second workbook that has an AutoClose macro in it, but he doesn't want it to run when the second workbook is closed. He is looking for a way to open the second workbook, under the control of the macro in the first workbook, without enabling the macros in the second workbook.

There is no way to disable the macros in the second workbook when opening it under macro control. (If you are opening it manually, you can obviously hold down the Shift key as the workbook opens, but that doesn't help your macro—it has no fingers to hold sown that key!)

There are a couple of workarounds, however. The first involves modifying your code that closes the second workbook, in this manner:

Application.EnableEvents = False
Workbooks("SecondBook.xls").Close
Application.EnableEvents = True

By setting the EnableEvents property to False, the event that is going to happen (closing the workbook) will not trigger the AutoClose macro. You can (and should) then set the EnableEvents property to True so that events can later continue.

Another workaround is to set some sort of "flag" in the AutoClose macro of the second workbook. This flag could test to see if the first workbook is open, and if it is, not run the main code in the AutoClose macro.

To do this, in the second workbook at the top of the module pages add the following code:

Dim AutoCloseDisabled as Boolean
Sub DisableAutoClose()
    AutoCloseDisabled=True
End Sub

Note that the declaration statement for the AutoCloseDisabled variable is outside of any procedure, which means that it will be global in scope and accessible within all the procedures.

Next, modify the AutoClose macro so that its body is enclosed within an If statement, as shown here:

Sub AutoClose()
    'variable declarations here

    If Not AutoCloseDisabled then

        'body of AutoClose here

    End if
End Sub

The idea is that when the second workbook is opened normally, the AutoCloseDisabled variable will be automatically set to False. (Boolean variables default to False when they are declared.) Since the DisableAutoClose procedure is never run in the workbook, the If statement in the AutoClose macro allows the actual body of the macro to be executed.

If you open the second workbook from your first workbook, then the code in your first workbook can call the DisableAutoClose macro in the second workbook, thereby setting the AutoCloseDisabled flag to True. This means that when the second workbook is closed, the If statement will skip over the body of the AutoClose macro.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3158) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Opening a Workbook but Disabling Macros.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Applying Bold Italics

Applying bold and italics formatting to text is easy in Word. If you want to apply bold and italics simultaneously, you can ...

Discover More

Dates with Periods

You may want Excel to format your dates using a pattern it doesn't normally use—such as using periods instead of ...

Discover More

Tab Key Won't Move from Cell to Cell in Locked Worksheet

Normally the Tab key can be used to move from one cell to another in Excel. If this cell movement doesn't work for you, it ...

Discover More

Excel Smarts for Beginners! Featuring the friendly and trusted For Dummies style, this popular guide shows beginners how to get up and running with Excel while also helping more experienced users get comfortable with the newest features. Check out Excel 2013 For Dummies today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Switching Windows in a Macro

When you have multiple workbooks open at the same time, Excel allows you to easily switch between those workbooks. How you do ...

Discover More

Telling which Worksheets are Selected

If your macro processes information on a number of worksheets, chances are good that you need your macro to figure out which ...

Discover More

Continuing Macro Lines

Sometimes a macro command line can get very, very long. This can make it hard to understand when you look at it a month or so ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 9 - 2?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.