Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Merging Many Workbooks.

Merging Many Workbooks

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 19, 2018)

1

Joy ran into a problem merging quite a few workbooks together. The majority of the workbooks—about 200 of them, all in a single folder—each contain a single worksheet, but some contain more. The worksheets form each of these workbooks needs to be added to a single workbook.

The easiest way to do merges of this magnitude—particularly if you have to do it often—is with a macro. The following macro displays a dialog box asking you to select the files to merge. (You can select multiple workbooks by holding down the Ctrl key as you click each one.) It loops thru the list you select, opening each one and moving all its worksheets to the end of the workbook with the code.

Sub CombineWorkbooks()
    Dim FilesToOpen
    Dim x As Integer
    Dim Outwbk As Workbook

    Set Outwbk = ActiveWorkbook

    On Error GoTo ErrHandler
    Application.ScreenUpdating = False

    FilesToOpen = Application.GetOpenFilename _
      (FileFilter:="Microsoft Excel Files (*.xls), *.xls", _
      MultiSelect:=True, Title:="Files to Merge")

    If TypeName(FilesToOpen) = "Boolean" Then
        MsgBox "No Files were selected"
        GoTo ExitHandler
    End If

    x = 1
    While x <= UBound(FilesToOpen)
        Workbooks.Open Filename:=FilesToOpen(x)
        Sheets().Move After:=Outwbk.Sheets(Outwbk.Sheets.Count)
        x = x + 1
    Wend

ExitHandler:
    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
    Exit Sub

ErrHandler:
    MsgBox Err.Description
    Resume ExitHandler
End Sub

In the process of adding the worksheets to the end of the workbook, Excel will automatically append a (2), (3), etc. when duplicates worksheet names are detected. Any formulas in the book referring to other sheets will also be updated to reflect the new names.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2409) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Merging Many Workbooks.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is two minus 1?

2018-08-21 21:25:43

Rebecca

Hi Allen

Thanks for all your helpful tips.

I was wondering if you do have a macro that is similar to this one but on combining worksheets within a single workbook instead.

I have these monthly workbooks which have worksheet for each day of month with same column headings; I need to look at daily data over a 12-month period... it is a massive tedious job to manually combine 12 workbook with 28 to 31 worksheets of data!

it is even harder on the fact that the data range I want to combine/append (not merge) is not in table format, so I need to incorporate the set maximum data range to include all daily entries (in the macro).

To summarize, what I want is to combine all daily transactions (rows) from 12 workbook into a single data sheet, so that I could analyse in PBI.

Hope that you would help me. Thanks Allen:)

Rebecca


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