Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Saving in Multiple Locations.

Saving in Multiple Locations

Written by Allen Wyatt (last updated November 21, 2020)
This tip applies to Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003


1

You may have a need to routinely copy a workbook to multiple locations on your system. For instance, the open workbook may need to be copied to a local hard drive and to several mapped drives that are actually on your office network.

Excel doesn't have a built-in capability to do this, but if the various locations are well defined, you can create a macro that will do the saving for you. The following macro is an example of such a tool:

Sub SaveToLocations()
    Dim OrigName As String

    OrigName = ActiveWorkbook.FullName
    ActiveWorkbook.SaveAs "G:\" + ActiveWorkbook.Name
    ActiveWorkbook.SaveAs "L:\" + ActiveWorkbook.Name
    ActiveWorkbook.SaveAs "K:\" + ActiveWorkbook.Name
    ActiveWorkbook.SaveAs "S:\" + ActiveWorkbook.Name
    ActiveWorkbook.SaveAs OrigName
End Sub

The particular example of the macro saves the active workbook to five different locations, all using the same workbook name. The macro determines the current location of the workbook so that it can save to the current location last. The reason this is done is so that you can continue to use the regular Save tool and get the expected results.

If you want to use this macro on your own system, all you need to do is to make sure that you change the drive letters of where each workbook will be saved. If one of the drives you specify is for a location that uses removable media, and there is no media in the drive, then the macro will generate an error and stop. You'll then have to figure out where the workbook was originally saved so you can manually resave it there (using Save As).

Another peculiarity of the macro is that since it uses the SaveAs method, if there is already a workbook at each of the destinations with the same name as the current workbook, Excel will ask if you want the existing version of the workbook overwritten. This will always be the case with the last save, into the original location.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2774) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Saving in Multiple Locations.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 4 - 1?

2021-05-28 04:11:11

Liran

Hi,

I have an add-on for Microsoft Office which does exactly that. It’s called SOS Click for Microsoft Office and is compatible with Word, Excel and PowerPoint. It saves to several places with one click and offers other features like auto-save and etc. More information is available at https://www.sos-click.com with screenshots and FAQ.

Hope this helps.


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