Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Importing Multiple Files to a Single Workbook.

Importing Multiple Files to a Single Workbook

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 16, 2019)

1

Let's say that you have a folder on your hard drive that contains thirty text files, and you want to import all of them to an Excel workbook. You want each text file to end up on its own worksheet in the workbook, so that you will have a total of thirty worksheets.

One way to do this is to manually add the desired worksheets, and then individually import each of the text files. This, as you can imagine, would quickly get tedious. A much better solution is to use a macro to do the importing, such as the following one.

Sub CombineTextFiles()
    Dim FilesToOpen
    Dim x As Integer
    Dim wkbAll As Workbook
    Dim wkbTemp As Workbook
    Dim sDelimiter As String

    On Error GoTo ErrHandler
    Application.ScreenUpdating = False

    sDelimiter = "|"

    FilesToOpen = Application.GetOpenFilename _
      (FileFilter:="Text Files (*.txt), *.txt", _
      MultiSelect:=True, Title:="Text Files to Open")

    If TypeName(FilesToOpen) = "Boolean" Then
        MsgBox "No Files were selected"
        GoTo ExitHandler
    End If

    x = 1
    Set wkbTemp = Workbooks.Open(FileName:=FilesToOpen(x))
    wkbTemp.Sheets(1).Copy
    Set wkbAll = ActiveWorkbook
    wkbTemp.Close (False)
    wkbAll.Worksheets(x).Columns("A:A").TextToColumns _
      Destination:=Range("A1"), DataType:=xlDelimited, _
      TextQualifier:=xlDoubleQuote, _
      ConsecutiveDelimiter:=False, _
      Tab:=False, Semicolon:=False, _
      Comma:=False, Space:=False, _
      Other:=True, OtherChar:="|"
    x = x + 1

    While x <= UBound(FilesToOpen)
        Set wkbTemp = Workbooks.Open(FileName:=FilesToOpen(x))
        With wkbAll
            wkbTemp.Sheets(1).Move After:=.Sheets(.Sheets.Count)
            .Worksheets(x).Columns("A:A").TextToColumns _
              Destination:=Range("A1"), DataType:=xlDelimited, _
              TextQualifier:=xlDoubleQuote, _
              ConsecutiveDelimiter:=False, _
              Tab:=False, Semicolon:=False, _
              Comma:=False, Space:=False, _
              Other:=True, OtherChar:=sDelimiter
        End With
        x = x + 1
    Wend

ExitHandler:
    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
    Set wkbAll = Nothing
    Set wkbTemp = Nothing
    Exit Sub

ErrHandler:
    MsgBox Err.Description
    Resume ExitHandler
End Sub 

This macro allows you to select which files you want to import, and then it places the data from those files onto the separate worksheets in the workbook. The macro assumes that the data being imported uses the pipe character (|) as a delimiter between fields.

If you know that the files to be imported are always in the specific folder, and that you want to import all the files in that folder, then you can simplify the macro a bit. The following example assumes that the files are in the folder c:\temp\load_excel, but you could change that folder name by making a simple change to fpath variable in the macro code.

Sub LoadPipeDelimitedFiles()
    Dim idx As Integer
    Dim fpath As String
    Dim fname As String

    idx = 0
    fpath = "c:\temp\load_excel\"
    fname = Dir(fpath & "*.txt")
    While (Len(fname) > 0)
        idx = idx + 1
        Sheets("Sheet" & idx).Select
        With ActiveSheet.QueryTables.Add(Connection:="TEXT;" _
          & fpath & fname, Destination:=Range("A1"))
            .Name = "a" & idx
            .FieldNames = True
            .RowNumbers = False
            .FillAdjacentFormulas = False
            .PreserveFormatting = True
            .RefreshOnFileOpen = False
            .RefreshStyle = xlInsertDeleteCells
            .SavePassword = False
            .SaveData = True
            .AdjustColumnWidth = True
            .RefreshPeriod = 0
            .TextFilePromptOnRefresh = False
            .TextFilePlatform = 437
            .TextFileStartRow = 1
            .TextFileParseType = xlDelimited
            .TextFileTextQualifier = xlTextQualifierDoubleQuote
            .TextFileConsecutiveDelimiter = False
            .TextFileTabDelimiter = False
            .TextFileSemicolonDelimiter = False
            .TextFileCommaDelimiter = False
            .TextFileSpaceDelimiter = False
            .TextFileOtherDelimiter = "|"
            .TextFileColumnDataTypes = Array(1, 1, 1)
            .TextFileTrailingMinusNumbers = True
            .Refresh BackgroundQuery:=False
            fname = Dir
        End With
    Wend
End Sub

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3148) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Importing Multiple Files to a Single Workbook.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Using Print Preview

The Print Preview feature can be a great way to see how something will look on paper without actually using any paper. ...

Discover More

Saving Find and Replace Operations

Want to repeat the same Find and Replace operation over and over again? Here are a couple of ways you can improve your ...

Discover More

Shortcut to Save as a PDF

Saving your documents in PDF format can be very helpful when you want to share a "finished" version with others. This tip ...

Discover More

Excel Smarts for Beginners! Featuring the friendly and trusted For Dummies style, this popular guide shows beginners how to get up and running with Excel while also helping more experienced users get comfortable with the newest features. Check out Excel 2013 For Dummies today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Crashing when Searching

If you use Excel's Open dialog box to search for files and you notice that doing so ends up crashing your system, you may ...

Discover More

Determining If a File Exists

Before you have your macro open and read a file from disk, you'll want to check to make sure it is really there. Here's ...

Discover More

Aligning Cells when Importing from CSV

When you import information from a CSV text file, Excel formats the data according to its default settings. Wouldn't it ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] (all 7 characters, in the sequence shown) in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is one more than 4?

2020-06-04 07:50:36

reader

Dear Sir
i am importing multiple text files in excel using the Macro given at this site

it is working but say for example u have data as 0010 it is changing it to 10 i tried to modify the code by
adding Destination:=Range("A1").NumberFormat = "@" in the script but it
is giving error texttocoloums method of range class failed

Regards


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.