Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Spreading Out a Table.

Spreading Out a Table

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 25, 2015)

Sometimes you may get a worksheet from someone else, and you need some room to work on the information provided. For instance, you may find it helpful to add some blank rows between each of the original rows in a data table. While this can be done rather easily using the Insert menu, it can quickly become tedious—particularly if you have a large table that you want to spread out.

The following macro will help you tremendously in this situation. All you need to do is select the first row in the data table. When you run the macro, it asks you how many blank rows you want to insert between the original rows. When you provide a number, the macro steps through the table and starts inserting blank rows. The macro stops when the first blank cell after the original table is detected.

Sub SpreadOut()
    Dim iBlanks As Integer
    Dim J As Integer

    iBlanks = InputBox("How many blank rows?", "Insert Rows")
    ActiveCell.Offset(1, 0).Select
    While ActiveCell.Value > "" And iBlanks > 0
        For J = 1 To iBlanks
            Selection.EntireRow.Insert
        Next J
        ActiveCell.Offset(iBlanks + 1, 0).Select
    Wend
End Sub

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2344) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Spreading Out a Table.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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