Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Working with Multiple Printers.

Working With Multiple Printers

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 2, 2013)

You already know that Windows supports multiple printers. Using Excel with multiple printers can be a bother, however, since you must display the Print dialog box, change the printer, and then print the worksheet.

There is a way, however, that you can have one-click printing of your worksheets on a designated printer. To do this, simply create a macro that changes the printer and then prints the worksheets, as shown here:

Sub GoodPrinter()
    Application.ActivePrinter = "HP LaserJet"
    ActiveWindow.SelectedSheets.PrintOut Copies:=1
End Sub

When you create this macro on your system, make sure you change the printer name in the second line of the macro. It must exactly match the name of a printer on your system. (In this example the printer name is set to "HP LaserJet". You should change it to match the name of the printer you want used.)

The trick is to create one of these macros for each of the printers you use. You can then modify a toolbar so that each printer has its own print button. When you then click on the command or button, the appropriate macro is run and you get output on the desired printer.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2217) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Working with Multiple Printers.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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