Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Specifying Your Target Monitor.

Specifying Your Target Monitor

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 11, 2015)

If you are developing Web pages in Excel, it is a good idea to have in mind who the user is. The user, obviously, is the person who will view your Web page. However, there are certain assumptions that must be made about the user, and those assumptions will affect how you put your Web page together.

One of the prime considerations is what resolution of monitor the user will be using. This affects the presentation of graphics and text on their page. For instance, a graphic that shows up nicely centered on your screen at a high resolution may not give the desired impact if the user is working at a lower resolution.

You can instruct Excel to make certain assumptions about the user's monitor resolution as you are developing Web pages. You set the target resolution by following these steps:

  1. Choose Options from the Tools menu. Excel displays the Options dialog box.
  2. Make sure the General tab is selected. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The General tab of the Options dialog box.

  4. Click on the Web Options button. Excel displays the Web Options dialog box.
  5. Make sure the Pictures tab is selected. (See Figure 2.)
  6. Figure 2. The Pictures tab of the Web Options dialog box.

  7. Using the Screen Size drop-down list, select the screen resolution you believe most of your users will have.
  8. Click on OK to close the Web Options dialog box.
  9. Click on OK to close the Options dialog box.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3409) applies to Microsoft Excel 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Specifying Your Target Monitor.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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