Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Placing Formula Results in a Comment.

Placing Formula Results in a Comment

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 21, 2018)

2

<h1>Placing Formula Results in a Comment[3374]</h1> Excel won't allow you to directly or automatically insert the results of a formula into a cell's comment. You can, however, use a macro to place that result exactly where you want it.

Bob asked if it is possible to write a formula and get the result in a comment, instead of in a cell. The short answer is that no, you can't do it with a formula. You can, however, do it with a macro. For instance, the following macro adds the contents of two cells (A1 and B1) and then sticks the result in a comment attached to cell C1:

Sub MakeComment()
    With Worksheets(1).Range("C1").AddComment
        .Visible = True
        .Text "Total of cell A1 plus cell B1 is equal to " & _
          ([A1].Value) + ([B1].Value)
    End With
End Sub

If you'd rather run the macro on a range of cells, then a different approach is necessary. The following macro loops thru all the cells in a selection. If the cell contains a formula, the macro puts the value (the formula's result) in a comment attached to that cell.

Sub ValueToComment()
    Dim rCell As Range
    For Each rCell In Selection
        With rCell
            If .HasFormula Then
                On Error Resume Next
                .Comment.Delete
                On Error GoTo 0
                .AddComment
                .Comment.Text Text:=CStr(rCell.Value)
            End If
        End With
    Next
    Set rCell = Nothing
End Sub

While looping through the cells in the selection, if one of the cells has a formula and an existing comment, then the comment is deleted and replaced with the new comment that contains the formula result. Afterwards the cell's value will display as well as a comment with the same number. Instead of CStr you could also use Format function to display the value in any way you might want.

You can also create a macro that will modify a comment whenever you update the contents of a particular cell. For instance, let's say that every time someone made a change in cell C11, you wanted the result of whatever is in that cell to be placed into a comment attached to cell F15. The following macro does just that:

Private Sub Worksheet_Change(ByVal Target As Range)
    Dim sResult As String

    If Union(Target, Range("C11")).Address = Target.Address Then
        Application.EnableEvents = False
        Application.ScreenUpdating = False
        sResult = Target.Value
        Target.ClearContents

        With Range("F15")
            .ClearComments
            .AddComment
            .Comment.Text Text:=sResult
        End With
        Application.EnableEvents = True
        Application.ScreenUpdating = True
    End If
End Sub

When someone enters a formula (or a value) into cell C11, the results of that formula (or the value itself) is placed into a comment that is attached to cell F15. Since this is an event-triggered macro, it needs to be entered in the code window for the worksheet on which it will function.

Finally, you may want to have your macro monitor an entire column. The following macro uses the Change event of a worksheet, just like the previous macro. It, however, only kicks into action if the change was made in column F, and only if a single cell in that column was changed.

Private Sub Worksheet_Change(ByVal Target As Range)
    If Target.Cells.Count > 1 Then Exit Sub
    If Target.Column <> 6 Then Exit Sub

    Dim x As String
    Application.EnableEvents = False
    If Target.HasFormula Then
        x = Evaluate(Target.Formula)
    Else
        x = Target.Text
    End If

    Target.ClearComments
    If Target.Text = "" Then
        Application.EnableEvents = True
        Exit Sub
    End If

    Target.AddComment x
    Target = ""
    Application.EnableEvents = True
End Sub

If the user makes a change to a single cell in column F, the macro grabs the result of what was entered and places it in a comment attached to that cell. The contents of the cell are then deleted.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3374) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Placing Formula Results in a Comment.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Putting a Different Date in a Header

Today's date is easy to add to a header, but what if you want to add a date that is adjusted in some manner? Adding ...

Discover More

ISO Week Numbers in Excel

Work in an industry that uses ISO standards when it comes to working with dates? You'll love the formula in this tip ...

Discover More

Printing Row Numbers

Excel displays row numbers on-screen that help you easily see what is in each row. If you want to print these row ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Splitting Cells by Case

Excel provides several different ways that you can split apart the contents of a cell. One way it doesn't provide is to ...

Discover More

Figuring Out the Low-Score Winner

Need to figure out the lowest score in a range of scores? Here's the formulas to get the information you need.

Discover More

Using Named Formulas Across Workbooks

You can use the naming capabilities of Excel to name both ranges and formulas. Accessing that named information in a ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 9 - 6?

2019-05-08 20:51:52

Radhe

Hi i am a teacher and I have put comments beside the mark a student gets. I need to know if can generate the comments in excel. For instance all marks ranging from 95-100 would carry the comment of excellent or all marks from 50 -64 would carry a comment of satisfactory. what i expect would look something like this.

English 95 excellent
Maths 74 Good
Social Science 54 satisfactory


2016-12-26 01:29:55

Riyan

Dear Allen Wyatt,

Sir, I need to solve formula to show "+"(Plus) amount as a "Discount", "-"(Minus) amount as a "Upselling"

Thanks & Best Regards.


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.