Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Viewing More than Two Places in a Worksheet.

Viewing More than Two Places in a Worksheet

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 7, 2015)

Jesse asked if there is a way to view more than two areas of a worksheet at the same time, other than by hiding rows.

The easiest solution is to just open additional windows for the worksheet. Choose Window | New Window. Excel opens additional windows that contain the exact same worksheet. You can then choose Window | Arrange to arrange the windows any way desired. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. The Arrange Windows dialog box.

When you open additional windows in this manner, the windows are independent of each other, meaning that you can scroll them independently. If you make a change in one window, the same change is made in all the windows. (This makes sense, since they all display the same data.)

Once the windows are situated the way you want them, you could save the arrangement as a view (View | Custom Views). That way you could quickly recall the appearance of your windows any time you desire.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3006) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Viewing More than Two Places in a Worksheet.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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