Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Workbook Events.

Workbook Events

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 21, 2015)

In the previous tip you learned how you can discover the various events that you can trap and program for in your macros. Excel also allows you to trap different events on a workbook level. You can discover a list of those events in much the same manner as you do for worksheets:

  1. Press Alt+F11 to display the VBA Editor.
  2. In the Project Explorer window (upper-left corner of the VBA Editor), find the project (workbook) that you are working on.
  3. Expand the project, if necessary, by clicking the plus sign to the left of the project name. You should see all the worksheets in the project listed.
  4. Double-click the ThisWorkbook item. A code window should appear for the workbook.
  5. At the top of the workbook's code window are two drop-down lists. In the left-hand drop-down list, choose Workbook.

At this point, the right-hand drop-down list contains all the events that you can "trap" for the workbook. The available events may vary, according to your version of Excel. In Excel 2003 there are 28 different events, too many to list here.

The names of the events should be descriptive enough that you can tell what triggers each of them. Notice that some of the events start with the word "Sheet" and duplicate the names of the worksheet events detailed in the previous tip. These events, because they are at a workbook level, apply to the workbook as a whole, even though they are triggered by events on a worksheet.

For example, if you choose to trap the SheetActivate event, then the macro will be run when any worksheet in the workbook is activated. Contrast this to the Activate event on the worksheet level, which is activated only when that particular worksheet is activated.

If you choose one of the events in the right-hand drop-down list, you can create the macro you want run when the event actually occurs.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2570) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Workbook Events.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Compound Page Numbering

Simple page numbering is easy to add to your documents. More complex numbering (such as two numbering schemes in the same ...

Discover More

Default Worksheet when Opening

When opening a workbook, you may want to make sure that a particular worksheet is always displayed first. The only way to ...

Discover More

Determining the Size of a File

When processing a document using a macro, you may need to know the precise size of a particular file. The way you figure this ...

Discover More

Excel Smarts for Beginners! Featuring the friendly and trusted For Dummies style, this popular guide shows beginners how to get up and running with Excel while also helping more experienced users get comfortable with the newest features. Check out Excel 2013 For Dummies today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

DOS From Macros

Need to run a DOS command from within one of your macros? The answer is the Shell command, described in this tip.

Discover More

Transferring Data between Worksheets Using a Macro

Macros can be used for all sorts of data processing needs. One need that is fairly common is the need to move data from one ...

Discover More

Understanding the If ... End If Structure

One of the most basic of programming structures is the conditional structure: If ... End If. This tip explains how this ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share