Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Last Saved Date in a Footer.

Last Saved Date in a Footer

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 18, 2017)

5

Lori wants the right side of the footer for her worksheet to include the date the workbook was last saved. Every time she tries to create a formula to do this, Excel displays an error message that states the "string is too long" and that she needs to delete some characters. She's not sure she understands why this is happening or how she can get the date she wants in the footer.

There is no actual formula that can put the last-saved date in a footer. Excel has no way (unlike Word) to put this tidbit of information there. There is a way you can do it, but the solution requires the use of a macro. The reason is because you are accessing system information—information outside of Excel itself—and that information can only be retrieved using a programming language such as VBA.

One approach is to add some code that runs whenever a workbook is saved. The code would update the desired footer with the current date:

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, _
  Cancel As Boolean)

    ActiveWorksheet.PageSetup.RightFooter = _
      "Last Saved: " & Format(Date, "mmmm d, yyyy")
End Sub

This macro, which should be stored in the ThisWorkbook object for the workbook you want to affect, updates the footer for the currently active worksheet. If you want to affect all the worksheets in a workbook, then a small change to the macro is in order:

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, _
  Cancel As Boolean)
    Dim sht As Worksheet

    For Each sht In Sheets
        sht.PageSetup.RightFooter = _
          "Last Saved: " & Format(Date, "mmmm d, yyyy")
    Next
End Sub

If today is December 12, 2011, then after running the macro (which is done automatically when saving), the right footers will all be set to "Last Saved: December 12, 2011".

You can also rely upon the file save date stored in Excel's built-in properties. The way you put that date into the footer is as follows:

Sub RightFooterLastSaved()
     ActiveSheet.PageSetup.RightFooter = _
       ActiveWorkbook.BuiltinDocumentProperties(12)
End Sub

The drawback to this macro is that you need to remember to run it periodically, so it is not quite as automatic as the previous approaches. You could, however, place the single line at the heart of the macro into the Workbook_BeforePrint event handler.

There is another approach you can use. This one involves requesting from Windows the actual date and time a file was saved.

Private Sub Workbook_Open()
    Dim sTemp As String
    Dim sht As Worksheet

    sTemp = FileDateTime(ActiveWorkbook.FullName)
    sTemp = "Last Saved: " & sTemp
    For Each sht In Sheets
        sht.PageSetup.RightFooter = sTemp
    Next sht
End Sub

This macro is designed to run whenever a workbook is first opened—it is saved as the Workbook_Open procedure of the ThisWorkbook object. The workhorse of the macro is the line that calls the FileDateTime function. This function can be used to determine the date and time any file was saved. It requires a full path name of a file, which is supplied by the FullName property of the ActiveWorkbook object. This date and time is then placed in the right footer of all the worksheets in the workbook.

Remember, as well, that the limit of what you can place into each section of the header or footer is approximately 250 characters. So if you adjust the macros to add more information to the right portion of the footer, make sure that it doesn't add up to that many characters, or you may have problems with the macro.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2190) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Last Saved Date in a Footer.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Potential Shortcut Key Problems

When configuring Word so that it matches your preference in shortcut keys, you need to be careful about what shortcut keys ...

Discover More

Alphabetic Column Designation

Want to know the letters assigned by Excel to a particular column? Excel normally deals with column numbers, but you can ...

Discover More

Working with Table Columns and Rows

Need to add or delete columns and rows from a table? It's easy to do using the tools provided in Word.

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Creating Long Page Footers

Ever wish that you could create nice, long footers that appear at the bottom of each page when you print your worksheet? ...

Discover More

Using a Different Footer on Secondary Pages

When printing a worksheet, you may want to have the footer different on the first page of your document than it is on ...

Discover More

Copying Headers and Footers

Need to copy headers and footers from one worksheet to another? How about from one workbook to another? Here are some ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is four less than 8?

2015-05-25 13:22:20

Michael (Micky) Avidan

@Robert Fletcher,
Try to save the workbook type as: "Macro enabled" (XLSM File extension).
Michael (Micky) Avidan
“Microsoft® Answers" - Wiki author & Forums Moderator
“Microsoft®” MVP – Excel (2009-2015)
ISRAEL


2015-05-24 21:05:13

Robert Fletcher

I am trying to put the date my Excel for Max was last saved in the footer. I followed your example. I am not knowledgeable with macros. I was to get on the developer tab. I selected Editor and then selected the ThisWorkbook. I got a blank VBA input space and entered the following from your website:

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, _
Cancel As Boolean)
ActiveWorksheet.PageSetup.RightFooter = _
"Last Saved: " & Format(Date, "mmmm d,yyyy")
End Sub

I then proceeded to save the workbook. An error message always appears "Visual Basic Macros will be removed if you save the file in this format." I am then directed to bug theVBA file.

What am I doing wrong? Why do I always get this error message even when I think I have removed the macro? Please help

Bob


2013-09-23 12:13:07

Andrea

Thanks so much! I've tried 3 codes now, and this is the only one that worked - perhaps because I wasn't told to open he "this workbook" section(using Excel 2010):

BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, _
Cancel As Boolean)
Dim sht As Worksheet

For Each sht In Sheets
sht.PageSetup.RightFooter = _
"Last Saved: " & Format(Date, "mmmm d, yyyy")
Next
End Sub


2013-05-03 13:14:22

awyatt

Not really. (Although you can click the link at the end of the article to see this tip on the site for later versions of Excel.)

I suspect you aren't putting the macros in the ThisWorkbook area as you must. Any macro that begins with "Workbook_" must be placed in the ThisWorkbook area. In the VBA Editor, use the Project Explorer to double-click the ThisWorkbook object for the workbook in which you are working. This action (double-clicking) displays a code window. It is within this code window that those macros beginning with "Workbook_" must be placed.

-Allen


2013-05-03 12:50:01

Michael Mercier

I am running Excel 2007. I copy pasted this program as described. the first program for active worksheet and also tried the seceond program for all sheets.
Neither one puts anything into the footer.
Is excel 2007 different?


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.