Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Rounding to the Nearest $50.

Rounding to the Nearest $50

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 2, 2017)

It is often necessary when creating financial reports to round figures to some value other than the nearest dollar. One common rounding point is to the nearest fifty dollars. If you need to round figures in this manner, then there are a number of formulas you can use to do the rounding.

The first approach is to use the MROUND function. This function allows you to round to any value you want, and has been covered in other ExcelTips. Basically, you would use the function as follows if the value you want to round is in cell B7:

=MROUND(B7,50)

The MROUND function is a part of the Analysis ToolPak included with Excel. If you don't want to install the toolpak or if you will be working with negative values, then you can't use MROUND. (The function returns errors if you use negative numbers.) In these instances, you can resort to the regular ROUND function. Either of the following variations will produce the exact same results:

=ROUND(F5/50,0)*50
=ROUND(F5*2,-2)/2

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2149) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Rounding to the Nearest $50.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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