Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Using the IRR Function.

Using the IRR Function

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 27, 2015)

3

The IRR function is provided by Excel so you can calculate an internal rate of return for a series of values. The IRR is the interest rate accrued on an investment consisting of payments and income that occur at the same regular periods. In the values provided to the function, you enter payments you make as negative values and income you receive as positive values.

For instance, let's say you are investing in your daughter's business, and she will make payments back to you annually over the course of four years. You are planning to invest $50,000, and you expect to receive $10,000 in the first year, $17,500 in the second year, $25,000 in the third, and $30,000 in the fourth.

Since the $50,000 is money you are paying out, it is entered in Excel as a negative value. The other values are entered as positive values. For instance, you could enter –50000 in cell D4, 10000 in cell D5, 17500 in cell D6, 25000 in cell D7, and 30000 in cell D8. To calculate the internal rate of return, you would use the following formula:

=IRR(D4:D8)

The function returns an IRR of 19.49%.

The ranges you use with the IRR function must include at least one payment and one receipt. If you get a #NUM error, and you have included payments and receipts in the range, then Excel needs more information to calculate the IRR. Specifically, you need to provide a "starting guess" for Excel to work with. For example:

=IRR(D4:D8, -5%)

This usage means that the IRR function starts calculating at –5%, and then recursively attempts to resolve the IRR based on the values in the range.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3209) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Using the IRR Function.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is five more than 2?

2015-09-24 06:36:55

jagan

Dear all, i have one problem , i want to enter the data everyday in column,but without holiday. please give it any solutiuon


2014-05-11 12:49:52

Barb

Don - I think you need the XIRR function as follows
put the dates in B1 - B5
1 Jan 14, 1 Jan 34 to 1 Jan 94
put amounts in C1 - C5
-280, 410 to 410
Then the rate of return can be found with this formula
=XIRR(C1:C5,B1:B5)
or this one
=XIRR(C1:C5,B1:B5,5%)
I think it gives 4.52%

Hope this helps


2014-04-21 13:17:07

Don

I plan to invest $280 for establishing a stand of trees. Revenue inputs will be $410 at each 20yrs, 40yrs, 60yrs, 80yrs. What will be the IRR?
Thank you


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