Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Getting the Name of the Parent Workbook.

Getting the Name of the Parent Workbook

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 12, 2021)

1

Many people use the CELL worksheet function to return the name of the current Excel workbook. A common way to use the function is as follows:

=CELL("filename")

Using the CELL function in this manner is fine, provided you only have one workbook open at a time. If you open more than one, then this usage can cause problems. Why? Because when used this way, CELL returns the name of the currently active workbook, not the workbook in which the formula is used.

To always return the name of the workbook in which CELL is used (sometimes called the "parent workbook"), you must alter the formula just a bit:

=CELL("filename", A1)

By adding a cell reference as the second parameter in the function, you are telling Excel that you want the name of the file containing that cell reference. In other words, CELL will return the name of the file in which cell A1 of the current worksheet is located. (You can also provide any other cell reference in place of A1, if more appropriate.)

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2047) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Getting the Name of the Parent Workbook.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is one less than 7?

2021-07-24 14:00:44

Krist J Walicky

Hi Allen,
I've been following your blog for months and always appreciate the quick insightful tips for Excel. I'm always looking to improve my excel skills and was not aware to add "A1" to the cell filename formula. I typically add the file name in the bottom left footer of my document but sometimes the path string is too long and runs into my middle footer. Placing the file name in the body of the worksheet allows you to see the path and lets you format this information. I find that the footer is tricky to format since you need to use the Print Preview feature in order to see the actual final layout of the text.
You are one of the most consistent and helpful Excel Blogger and I truly appreciate all of your tips - you have made me a better user!
Best
-Krist


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