Multiple Line Headers and Footers

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 15, 2014)

2

If you use a macro code to set your header or footer, you can designate more than one line for them. Thus, you could have a two or three line header or footer, if desired. You do this by simply including the code Chr(13) into the string you use to set the header or footer. When used with the command codes discussed in other issues of ExcelTips, this is very powerful, indeed.

For instance, let's say you wanted a centered header that included your company name on the first line with today's date on the second. You would use the following code:

ActiveSheet.PageSetup.CenterHeader = "&C&BAmalgamated Widgets, Inc.&B"
& Chr(13) & "&D"

Note the use of the &B command code to make the company name bold. The second use of the command code is to turn the bold attribute off, so that the date does not end up being bold. Also, note the use of the &C command code. Remember that the use of positioning command codes such as these overrides placement. Thus, the following code (which would normally place the information at the left side of the header) has the exact same results as the previous code:

ActiveSheet.PageSetup.LeftHeader = "&C&BAmalgamated Widgets, Inc.&B"
& Chr(13) & "&D"

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (1992) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 6 - 4?

2015-03-27 09:58:05

Chuck Siegmann

This is great, but how do you create multiple heared lines when you don't use macro codes to set the headers and footers. Limitations like this is why i spend so much time creating tables in Word.


2014-11-18 10:12:23

Don

It's frustrating when you have ads that cover up text in your article.


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