Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Adjusting Row Height for a Number of Worksheets.

Adjusting Row Height for a Number of Worksheets

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 9, 2013)

Ron knows how to adjust the height of a group of adjacent rows. What he doesn't know (and needs to) is how to make row heights the same across several worksheets in the same workbook.

The trick to this operation is to simply make sure that you select all the worksheets you want to affect. Take a look at the worksheet tabs at the bottom of the program window. You should see one for each worksheet in your workbook. If you want to affect the rows in a series of consecutive worksheets, click the tab for the first worksheet in the series and hold down the Shift key as you click the tab for the last. If the worksheets you want to affect are not consecutive, click the tab for one of the worksheets and then hold down the Ctrl key as you click on the tabs for each of the others.

With all the worksheets you want to affect selected, select the rows within the worksheet you can see. As you adjust the row height for those rows, Excel automatically adjusts the row height for the same rows in each of the other selected worksheets.

When you are done, click on a single worksheet tab. This cancels the selected set of worksheets, and you can continue to work as you desire. (If you don't cancel the selection set, then any changes you make on the screen continue to be made in all the selected worksheets.)

If you need to adjust row heights quite a bit, and your formatting is always the same, then you might benefit from having a macro to affect the sheets. The following macro steps through each selected worksheet and adjusts the height of rows 1 through 5. (You should obviously change the row height in the macro and the row numbers to reflect what you really need.)

Sub row_hts()
    For Each wksht In Worksheets
        Set sht = wksht
        sht.Rows("1:5").RowHeight = 25
    Next
End Sub

You can easily assign the macro to a shortcut key or a menu option so it can quickly be executed.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12510) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Adjusting Row Height for a Number of Worksheets.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Special Characters in Pattern Matching

The most powerful search engine in Word use pattern matching, but the way you specify special characters in a ...

Discover More

Copying and Moving Footnotes and Endnotes

If you need to move footnotes or endnotes from one location to another in a document, you can use editing techniques you ...

Discover More

How to Stop a Table Row from Splitting Over Two Pages

Do you want your table rows to be split between pages? Word allows you to format the table so that rows stay together and ...

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

Setting Row Height

When you enter information into a row on a worksheet, Excel automatically adjusts the height of the row based on what you ...

Discover More

Hiding and Unhiding Rows

When building a worksheet, you may need to hide some of the rows or unhide other, previously hidden, rows. It's easy to do; ...

Discover More

Detecting Hidden Rows

Excel allows you to easily hide rows in a worksheet, so their contents are not visible. Figuring out how to detect where ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share