Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Positioning a Graphic in a Macro.

Positioning a Graphic in a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 28, 2015)

2

Felix is writing a macro to add a graphic to a worksheet. He needs to position the graphic relative to the top-left corner of a particular cell. He wonders how he can place the graphic, within the macro code, so it is just to the right and beneath the upper-left corner of a given cell.

This task is relatively easy to do if you realize that each cell in a worksheet has both a Top and Left property that defines the location of both the top and left edges of the cell. You can adjust those values, slightly, to get the offset that you want, in this manner:

Dim rCell As Range
Set rCell = Range("A2")
With ActiveSheet.Shapes("Picture 1")
    .Top = rCell.Top + 5
    .Left = rCell.Left + 3
End With

Note that after this code is executed the graphic (defined by the name Picture 1) is placed just below the top edge of cell A2 and just to the right of its left edge.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (9725) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Positioning a Graphic in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is eight minus 3?

2015-04-01 10:58:40

Kelly Runyon

Interesting and helpful add-on from Morris... thanks for that!


2015-03-28 12:40:06

Morris Manning

Great tip! Wish I had had it when I was designing a budgeting template.

I have a budget application that has a command button attached to each account line-item that does something. The number of rows of data detail may vary within line-iems. When data is entered into a line item, a criteria (*) is automatically set in an adjacent column.

Using a toggle button to filter the sheet data, I can roll-up and show only the rows with data. (Toggling the filter off reveals all accounts.) The problem I encountered is that the line-item command buttons would move, sometimes piling on top of each other.

I used the method decribed in this tip to anchor command buttons to the appropriate cells in the budget detail sheet by calling the above code in the toggle-button code. In order to accommodate variable rows of data, I assigned range names to cells with attached command buttons rather than cell coordinates. That overcomes the problems of fixed cell references with variable data. I also included code to make the buttons invisible during the roll-up. In the cell under each button is the account code which is visble during the roll-up but hidden by the command buttons when data is unfiltered.


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