Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Freezing Top Rows and Bottom Rows.

Freezing Top Rows and Bottom Rows

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 7, 2016)

Kevin has a long (vertical) worksheet that has the first few rows frozen so the column headings are always visible. He would like to also freeze the bottom row, so the column totals are always visible.

Unfortunately there is no way to do this in Excel. At first thought you may believe that you can freeze rows and also split the worksheet window so that you can put the totals below the split. Excel won't let you do this, however—when you try, then the freeze is removed and replaced with the split, and trying to reapply the freeze removes the split.

What most experienced Excel users do is to put the column totals at the top of the columns instead of at the bottom. This may seem awkward, but it has the added benefit of allowing you to easily add new rows to your data table. The top-of-column totals could be added either using SUM formulas (as you would with the totals at the bottom), or you can leave the totals at the bottom of the columns and simply add a referential formula (like =B327) in a row at the top of columns.

There is another approach you can use, however. Start by opening the workbook that contains the worksheet you want to work on. (This should be the only workbook open.) Then follow these steps:

  1. Choose New Window from the Window. Excel creates a new window on the data in the worksheet you are working on.
  2. Select the Arrange option from the Window. You should see the Arrange Windows dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Arrange Windows dialog box.

  4. Make sure the Horizontal radio button is selected.
  5. Click OK.

At this point you should see your two windows—one in the top half of the screen and the other beneath it. Use the mouse to adjust the vertical height of both windows. (The bottom window should be large enough to hold your totals and the top window can occupy the rest of the available space.)

Now you can display the totals row (or rows) in the bottom window, and freeze the top rows in the top window. This allows you to see everything you want to see, although it is a bit expensive when it comes to screen real estate since both windows have column letters visible.

The biggest drawback to this approach is that the windows are not horizontally linked. This means that if you scroll one of the windows left or right, the other window doesn't scroll at the same time. You could write some VBA code to handle the horizontal scrolling, but that simple adds complexity to the situation.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3286) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Freezing Top Rows and Bottom Rows.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Removing Shortcuts for Macros

Word apparently has a bug in it that makes it very difficult to remove a shortcut key previously associated with a macro. ...

Discover More

Printing a Short Selection

Want to print just a selection from within your document? It's easy to do when you print using the Print dialog box.

Discover More

Formatting a PivotTable

You can format PivotTables using either manual formatting or automatic formatting. You need to be careful, however, as only ...

Discover More

Solve Real Business Problems Master business modeling and analysis techniques with Excel and transform data into bottom-line results. This hands-on, scenario-focused guide shows you how to use the latest Excel tools to integrate data from multiple tables. Check out Microsoft Excel 2013 Data Analysis and Business Modeling today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

Shortcut to Move between Two Worksheets

Moving between to adjacent worksheets is easy; Excel provides a shortcut key to do the trick. If you want to move between two ...

Discover More

Returning a Worksheet Name

Need to know the name of the current worksheet? You can use the CELL function as the basis for finding this information and ...

Discover More

Disabling Moving Between Worksheets

If you want someone to not be able to move from one worksheet to another in a workbook, you've got your work cut out for you. ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share