Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Using Go To to Jump to a Chart Sheet.

Using Go To to Jump to a Chart Sheet

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 30, 2013)

When you want to jump to a specific worksheet in a workbook, you can use the Go To feature of Excel to make the jump painless, in the following manner:

  1. Press F5. Excel displays the Go To dialog box.
  2. In the Reference box, enter MySheet!A1. (Replace "MySheet" with the name of the worksheet you want to jump to.)
  3. Click OK.

This works great for regular worksheets, but it won't work if you want to jump to a chart sheet. Why? Because Go To is used to jump to specific cells (in this case, cell A1 on MySheet), and chart sheets have no cells you can reference.

If you want a quick way to jump to a chart sheet, you will need to resort to a macro. You can have the macro ask for a chart sheet name, and then use the Activate or Select methods with the sheet name. The pertinent line of the macro—the one that does the actual "jumping"—can be either of these:

Sheets("MyChart").Activate
Sheets("MyChart").Select

All you need to do is substitute the proper name of the chart sheet in place of "MyChart."

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3124) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Using Go To to Jump to a Chart Sheet.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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