Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Formatting for Hundredths of Seconds.

Formatting for Hundredths of Seconds

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 8, 2016)

11

Paolo wants to record times in an Excel workbook, but he needs the times to be precise, including hundredths of a second. What he would like is a format such as 1.41.73, meaning 1 minute, 41 seconds, and 73 hundredths.

This type of formatting can be easily applied to a cell in the following manner:

  1. Select the cell or cells you want to format.
  2. Choose Cells from the Format menu. Excel displays the Format Cells dialog box.
  3. Make sure the Number tab is selected.
  4. In the Category list, choose Custom. (See Figure 1.)
  5. Figure 1. The Number tab of the Format Cells dialog box.

  6. In the Type box, enter the following: [h]:mm:ss.00
  7. Click OK.

The format shows elapsed time, with hours, minutes, seconds, and hundredths of seconds. If you prefer, you can change what delimiters are used between each element of the time. For instance, if you want to use decimal points and drop off the hours, you can use the following format in step 4: mm.ss.00.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3085) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Formatting for Hundredths of Seconds.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is two more than 4?

2016-02-08 14:27:29

Ron Coreau

Hello

I'm trying to convert an old running log that has the time in 100's of second.
Tried various was to do it but cannot obtain a consistent output.

Example 250100 seconds /6000 equals 41.68. Sometime the conversion formula works to 41:41 other times it does not.

=FLOOR.MATH(M14)&(M14-FLOOR.MATH(M14))*60 and then next cell =TEXT(N14,"0:00")

Great site

Thanks for any help.

Ron Coreau


2016-01-19 13:44:48

Scott Renz

Hi Blaz,

You click on Custom then in the box under Type: you type in your formula.


2016-01-19 13:41:57

Scott Renz

Thanks, Rick Harris.


2016-01-17 11:15:49

Blaz

In my excel missing this formula. I have only in format mm:ss.0. How to get your formula?


2014-07-28 14:34:45

Alan Jacklin

Can still not get this to work as I am trying to change 90.05 (ss:00) into (mm:ss.00)as it should be coming out like 1 (min) .30 (seconds) :05 (100s of a second)


2014-02-17 11:14:56

Rick Harris

Scott - Did you ever get an answer to your question from July?
If you enter the format as [h]:mm:ss."00" it will round to the nearest second and display the .00 at the end each time.


2014-02-17 11:08:53

Rick Harris

But how do I get 2.59 hours to display as 02:35:24 (2 hours, 35 minutes, & 24 seconds)? As soon as I set the format to a time base, Excel looks at this as 2.59 days.
Thank you


2013-11-25 09:42:08

Scott Renz

Hi Nicholas,

No, it does not appear. You have to type it in yourself from your keyboard.


2013-11-24 11:57:32

Nicholas Jackson

I have office 2007 and this combination doesn't appear ([h]:mm:ss.00), is there somewhere you can download it or update?

Thanks


2013-07-04 17:05:56

Sama

I am really thankful for your tip :) it took me lots of hours to solve this problem but I couldnot!

Thanks


2013-07-01 11:29:24

Scott Renz

What if I want to add hard coded .00 at the end of each time?


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