Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Copying Comments to Cells.

Copying Comments to Cells

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 4, 2016)

5

Hector has a large worksheet containing approximately 600 rows and 70 columns. Spread throughout these 43,000 cells are about 200 cells with comments. Hector wants to extract the comments and place them into cells to the right of the main body of the data table. If a comment, for instance, is attached to cell C43, then he'd like the text from that comment to end up in cell CC43 and the original comment to be deleted.

You might think that you could use Paste Special to perform the task, but that doesn't work. If you copy the original cells and then use Edit | Paste Special | Comments, then only the comments are pasted to the target cells. They are still comments, and not text in cells, which goes against Hector's goal.

The only way to handle this type of extraction is to use a macro. The following, when run on a selection of cells, will extract the comments, move the comment text, and then delete the original comment.

Sub CommentsToCells()
    Dim rCell As Excel.Range
    Dim rData As Excel.Range
    Dim sComment As String

    ' Horizontal displacement
    Const iColOffset As Integer = 78

    ' extract comments from selected range
    If TypeName(Selection) = "Range" Then
        Set rData = Intersect(Selection, ActiveSheet.UsedRange)
        For Each rCell In rData.Cells
            On Error Resume Next
            sComment = rCell.Comment.Text
            If Len(sComment) > 0 Then
                rCell.Offset(, iColOffset).Value = sComment
                rCell.Comment.Delete
            End If
            sComment = ""
            On Error GoTo 0
        Next
    End If
End Sub

The macro uses the iColOffset constant to specify how many cells to the right a comment's text should be moved. In this case, the offset (78) is equal to three "alphabets" (26 * 3), so the text of a comment originally in column C will end up in column CC.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2981) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Copying Comments to Cells.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is six less than 6?

2017-03-29 10:42:53

Antonio

How do you select the cell range this macro will work on?


2017-03-08 12:55:42

Emma

Do you have instructions anywhere for how to do macros? I've seen plenty of tutorials on how to record them and use them but most often the solutions I need are the ones in grey boxes on people's websites (like this one). I've just never found any information on where I'm supposed to put that text or what modifications are needed to it and how to do them.


2015-11-03 10:33:16

Ian Kelly

Thanks Allen - that saved me a lot of time!


2013-03-06 10:37:07

Sheri

This was a great tip! I searched the internet for a while now and this was the best one. Thank you!


2011-12-16 04:34:02

Francois

Thanks for this tip. How do you use it when the content of the comment is an image?
I want to move all images in comments into their own cells, in the next column.
Thanks in advance!


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