Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Copying Comments to Cells.

Copying Comments to Cells

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 4, 2016)

5

Hector has a large worksheet containing approximately 600 rows and 70 columns. Spread throughout these 43,000 cells are about 200 cells with comments. Hector wants to extract the comments and place them into cells to the right of the main body of the data table. If a comment, for instance, is attached to cell C43, then he'd like the text from that comment to end up in cell CC43 and the original comment to be deleted.

You might think that you could use Paste Special to perform the task, but that doesn't work. If you copy the original cells and then use Edit | Paste Special | Comments, then only the comments are pasted to the target cells. They are still comments, and not text in cells, which goes against Hector's goal.

The only way to handle this type of extraction is to use a macro. The following, when run on a selection of cells, will extract the comments, move the comment text, and then delete the original comment.

Sub CommentsToCells()
    Dim rCell As Excel.Range
    Dim rData As Excel.Range
    Dim sComment As String

    ' Horizontal displacement
    Const iColOffset As Integer = 78

    ' extract comments from selected range
    If TypeName(Selection) = "Range" Then
        Set rData = Intersect(Selection, ActiveSheet.UsedRange)
        For Each rCell In rData.Cells
            On Error Resume Next
            sComment = rCell.Comment.Text
            If Len(sComment) > 0 Then
                rCell.Offset(, iColOffset).Value = sComment
                rCell.Comment.Delete
            End If
            sComment = ""
            On Error GoTo 0
        Next
    End If
End Sub

The macro uses the iColOffset constant to specify how many cells to the right a comment's text should be moved. In this case, the offset (78) is equal to three "alphabets" (26 * 3), so the text of a comment originally in column C will end up in column CC.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2981) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Copying Comments to Cells.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Converting Charts to GIF Files

You spent a lot of time getting your chart to look just the way you wanted. Now you want to create a graphic file from ...

Discover More

Condensing and Expanding Headings

When working in Outline view, you'll undoubtedly have the need to expand or condense information under your headings. It ...

Discover More

Determining If a Date is between Other Dates

Need to figure out if one date is between two other dates? There are a wide variety of formulaic approaches you could use ...

Discover More

Professional Development Guidance! Four world-class developers offer start-to-finish guidance for building powerful, robust, and secure applications with Excel. The authors show how to consistently make the right design decisions and make the most of Excel's powerful features. Check out Professional Excel Development today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Moving Comment Background Pictures to Cells

When formatting comments, you can use a graphic as a background for the comment box. If you later want to move this ...

Discover More

Finding and Replacing Text in Comments

Excel allows you to add comments to individual cells in your workbook. Unfortunately, Excel doesn't provide a way to ...

Discover More

Changing the Comment Color

Normally Excel displays comments in a color reminiscent of sticky notes you keep around your office. If you want them to ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is four less than 5?

2017-03-29 10:42:53

Antonio

How do you select the cell range this macro will work on?


2017-03-08 12:55:42

Emma

Do you have instructions anywhere for how to do macros? I've seen plenty of tutorials on how to record them and use them but most often the solutions I need are the ones in grey boxes on people's websites (like this one). I've just never found any information on where I'm supposed to put that text or what modifications are needed to it and how to do them.


2015-11-03 10:33:16

Ian Kelly

Thanks Allen - that saved me a lot of time!


2013-03-06 10:37:07

Sheri

This was a great tip! I searched the internet for a while now and this was the best one. Thank you!


2011-12-16 04:34:02

Francois

Thanks for this tip. How do you use it when the content of the comment is an image?
I want to move all images in comments into their own cells, in the next column.
Thanks in advance!


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.