Turning on Placeholders

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 29, 2015)

1

If you are working with a large worksheet that has a large number of graphics, you may have noticed that Excel slows down quite a bit when displaying the graphics. This can be particularly distracting, especially if your graphics are quite detailed or are being loaded across a busy network connection.

You can speed up the display of your worksheet by using placeholders. This results in Excel displaying boxes where your graphics would normally appear. This means that Excel does not have to redisplay the complete graphic, and therefore your display will be much faster. To turn on placeholders, follow these steps:

  1. Choose Options from the Tools menu. You will see the Options dialog box.
  2. Click on the View tab. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The View tab of the Options dialog box.

  4. Use the Show Placeholders check box to control whether placeholders are used by Excel. Click on the check box to turn the capability on and off; a check in the box means placeholders are enabled.
  5. Click on OK.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2942) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 9 + 8?

2015-04-07 13:46:38

pramukh

Hi Allen,
I wanted to place alphabet 'X' if the user does not enter his value into the cell and in case this value is delated the cell shall assume value 'X' again.

This 'X' generates a default value in my formula in the downstream. I am using excel 2010 where I could not find this illustration.
Can you help me out in finding the solution.


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