Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Generating a List of Macros.

Generating a List of Macros

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 18, 2018)

6

Once you start writing Excel macros, it is easy to get quite a few of them in a workbook. At some point you may want to generate a list of macros in your workbook. There is no intrinsic way within Excel to create a list of macros. You can, however, create a macro that will list your macros. (Sort of sounds redundant, doesn't it?)

As an example, consider the following macro, which steps through all the projects in your workbook to garner all the macro names and place them in a worksheet:

Sub ListMacros()
    Dim VBComp As VBComponent
    Dim VBCodeMod As CodeModule
    Dim oListsheet As Object
    Dim StartLine As Long
    Dim ProcName As String
    Dim iCount As Integer

    Application.ScreenUpdating = False
    On Error Resume Next
    Set oListsheet = ActiveWorkbook.Worksheets.Add
    iCount = 1
    oListsheet.[a1] = "Macro"

    For Each VBComp In ThisWorkbook.VBProject.VBComponents
        Set VBCodeMod = ThisWorkbook.VBProject.VBComponents(VBComp.Name).CodeModule
        With VBCodeMod
            StartLine = .CountOfDeclarationLines + 1
            Do Until StartLine >= .CountOfLines
                oListsheet.[a1].Offset(iCount, 0).Value = _
                  .ProcOfLine(StartLine, vbext_pk_Proc)
                iCount = iCount + 1

                StartLine = StartLine + _
                  .ProcCountLines(.ProcOfLine(StartLine, _
                   vbext_pk_Proc), vbext_pk_Proc)
            Loop
        End With
        Set VBCodeMod = Nothing
    Next VBComp

    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
End Sub

In order to use this macro, you must make sure you have the Microsoft VBA extensibility reference set. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. In the VBA Editor, choose References from the Tools menu. The References dialog box is displayed. (See Figure 1.)
  2. Figure 1. The References dialog box.

    ***Insert Figure X �
  3. Scroll through the list of Available References and make sure the Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications Extensibility check box is selected.
  4. Close the dialog box.

When you run the macro, it adds a new worksheet to your workbook, and then lists the names of all the macros in all the modules in the workbook.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2715) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Generating a List of Macros.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is nine more than 4?

2019-08-30 11:02:33

Sherry Fox

Allen,

I am a big fan of your code work! I find myself at your site often! This code is awesome. As a developer I have to list all the macros within any project I create and provide an explanation of their purpose. Before just creating a list was an issue. It is much simpler now. I would like to ask for two small upgrade.

1. I would like to see the module name as well and the macro names.
2. Any private macros also include the sheet they are stored in


2019-07-25 03:17:47

Ken Varley

I have copied this & it works great.

However, it doesn't list the parameters that are passed into the procs, it only gives the Proc name. Can you provide the extra lines of code please.

Also, it would be nice if it would list the Module too


2017-02-23 20:44:33

Jim Percy

My List Macros macro gives many"Worksheet_Selectionchange" lines ?
Otherwise seems OK
Jim Percy


2016-11-19 03:07:10

piecevcake

Thanks -
I ran the sub in personal.xlsb in excel 2007 and it hung - ?


2016-09-25 14:40:33

George Corbett

Alan,
I wanted to thank you very much for your excellent software which lists all macros in an Excel Workbook.

I have been looking for some software to last all macros for quite a while. Yours is the only one which worked,
and it worked the first time out!

I do not understand all that is going on, but it makes no difference as I can now properly document my projects.

Thanks again for a great piece of software.

George Corbett


2015-06-03 16:45:25

Gail

GREAT tip...just what I have been looking for to see all macro names. I have over 200 macros and people are wanting some of them...it's so easy for them to get out of hand. Now I can go in and organize them.
Thank you


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