Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Generating a List of Macros.

Generating a List of Macros

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 22, 2020)

2

Once you start writing Excel macros, it is easy to get quite a few of them in a workbook. At some point you may want to generate a list of macros in your workbook. There is no intrinsic way within Excel to create a list of macros. You can, however, create a macro that will list your macros. (Sort of sounds redundant, doesn't it?)

As an example, consider the following macro, which steps through all the projects in your workbook to garner all the macro names and place them in a worksheet:

Sub ListMacros()
    Dim VBComp As VBComponent
    Dim VBCodeMod As CodeModule
    Dim oListsheet As Object
    Dim StartLine As Long
    Dim ProcName As String
    Dim iCount As Integer

    Application.ScreenUpdating = False
    On Error Resume Next
    Set oListsheet = ActiveWorkbook.Worksheets.Add
    iCount = 1
    oListsheet.[a1] = "Macro"

    For Each VBComp In ThisWorkbook.VBProject.VBComponents
        Set VBCodeMod = ThisWorkbook.VBProject.VBComponents(VBComp.Name).CodeModule
        With VBCodeMod
            StartLine = .CountOfDeclarationLines + 1
            Do Until StartLine >= .CountOfLines
                oListsheet.[a1].Offset(iCount, 0).Value = _
                  .ProcOfLine(StartLine, vbext_pk_Proc)
                iCount = iCount + 1

                StartLine = StartLine + _
                  .ProcCountLines(.ProcOfLine(StartLine, _
                   vbext_pk_Proc), vbext_pk_Proc)
            Loop
        End With
        Set VBCodeMod = Nothing
    Next VBComp

    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
End Sub

In order to use this macro, you must make sure you have the Microsoft VBA extensibility reference set. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. In the VBA Editor, choose References from the Tools menu. The References dialog box is displayed. (See Figure 1.)
  2. Figure 1. The References dialog box.

    ***Insert Figure X �
  3. Scroll through the list of Available References and make sure the Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications Extensibility check box is selected.
  4. Close the dialog box.

When you run the macro, it adds a new worksheet to your workbook, and then lists the names of all the macros in all the modules in the workbook.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2715) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Generating a List of Macros.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is six minus 3?

2020-12-31 20:58:19

Peter

This is great. Your code also taught me the .[a1] syntax.
Is it possible to include additional columns for the shortcut keystroke and the description?
Peter


2020-12-29 10:59:13

Sherry Fox

Allen,

Just wanted to say thanks so much for sharing this code! I have seen a few that list the macros within a pop-up message box. But that still forces me to manually copy each name into Excel. Having your macro to list all macros is very helpful during my development. I tag each macro as I "version" them and delete all but my final version for each of the macros I write. Then I re-run your code, and use it to create my metric legend and work instructions for any projects I develop. Anyways I love this macro and will use it constantly. But I have one question, is there any way that this macro can be modified to list macros within the ACTIVE workbook, and the new sheet to the ACTIVE workbook, but be run from the PERSONAL workbook. I ask as I have been constantly copying this code into multiple development workbooks from my Personal workbook. Thanks again.


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