Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Printing Workbook Properties.

Printing Workbook Properties

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 23, 2013)

When you are putting together a workbook, Excel tracks quite a bit of information that it collectively refers to as workbook properties. You can view the different properties maintained by Excel by simply choosing the Properties option from the File menu.

In Word you have the option to print document properties, if you desire. There is no intrinsic way to print workbook properties in Excel. Instead, you must resort to a macro that will place the names and values of the properties into a worksheet. You can then print the worksheet and have your workbook properties available in hardcopy format.

The following VBA macro is an example of a good way to copy all the workbook properties to a worksheet that can be printed:

Public Sub WorksheetProperties()
    Dim p As DocumentProperty
    Dim iRow As Integer

    'Built in Properties
    iRow = 1
    Cells(iRow, 1).Value = "Built-in Properties"
    Cells(iRow, 1).Font.Bold = True
    iRow = iRow + 1
    Worksheets(1).Activate
    For Each p In ActiveWorkbook.BuiltinDocumentProperties
        On Error Resume Next
        Cells(iRow, 2).Value = p.Name
        'If no value then Excel causes an error so ignore!
        Cells(iRow, 3).Value = p.Value
        iRow = iRow + 1
    Next
    On Error GoTo 0

    'Custom Properties
    iRow = iRow + 1
    Cells(iRow, 1).Value = "Custom Properties"
    Cells(iRow, 1).Font.Bold = True
    iRow = iRow + 1
    For Each p In ActiveWorkbook.CustomDocumentProperties
        On Error Resume Next
        Cells(iRow, 2).Value = p.Name
        Cells(iRow, 3).Value = p.Value
        iRow = iRow + 1
    Next
    On Error GoTo 0
End Sub

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2491) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Printing Workbook Properties.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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