Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Retrieving Worksheet Names.

Retrieving Worksheet Names

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 21, 2016)

If you have a very large number of worksheets in a workbook, you might want to retrieve the names of those worksheets and put then on their own worksheet. For instance, you may want them in one place so you can use them in a table of contents or in some other fashion. The following macro, GetSheets, will quickly retrieve the names of the worksheets in the current workbook and put them in the first column of the current workbook, beginning at cell A1.

Sub GetSheets()
    Dim J As Integer
    Dim NumSheets As Integer

    NumSheets = Sheets.Count
    For J = 1 To NumSheets
        Cells(J, 1) = Sheets(J).Name
    Next J
End Sub

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2274) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Retrieving Worksheet Names.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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