Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Determining If a Number is Odd or Even.

Determining If a Number is Odd or Even

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 25, 2018)

A common programming task is validating user input. Often, your macro may need to determine if a number entered by a user is odd or even. For instance, suppose you wrote your own macro that asked the user what worksheet number they wanted to process. If your macro had to process odd and even worksheets differently, then you need to figure out if the number the user provided was odd or even. The technique for this is relatively simple, as shown here:

Even = (UserNum Mod 2) - 1

After execution of this line, Even will be True (-1) if UserNum was even, or False (0) if UserNum was odd.

Note:

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ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2273) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Determining If a Number is Odd or Even.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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