Hiding Rows Based on a Cell Value

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 10, 2014)

Excel provides conditional formatting which allows you to change the color and other attributes of a cell based on the content of the cell. There is no way, unfortunately, to easily hide rows based on the value of a particular cell in a row. You can, however, achieve the same effect by using a macro to analyze the cell and adjust row height accordingly. The following macro will examine a particular cell in the first 100 rows of a worksheet, and then hide the row if the value in the cell is less than 5.

Sub HideRows()
    BeginRow = 1
    EndRow = 100
    ChkCol = 3

    For RowCnt = BeginRow To EndRow
        If Cells(RowCnt, ChkCol).Value < 5 Then
            Cells(RowCnt, ChkCol).EntireRow.Hidden = True
        End If
    Next RowCnt
End Sub

You can modify the macro so that it checks a different beginning row, ending row, and column by simply changing the first three variables set in the macro. You can also easily change the value that is checked for within the For ... Next loop.

You should note that this macro doesn't unhide any rows, it simply hides them. If you are checking the contents of a cell that can change, you may want to modify the macro a bit so that it will either hide or unhide a row, as necessary. The following variation will do the trick:

Sub HURows()
    BeginRow = 1
    EndRow = 100
    ChkCol = 3

    For RowCnt = BeginRow To EndRow
        If Cells(RowCnt, ChkCol).Value < 5 Then
            Cells(RowCnt, ChkCol).EntireRow.Hidden = True
        Else
            Cells(RowCnt, ChkCol).EntireRow.Hidden = False
        End If
    Next RowCnt
End Sub

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (1940) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Removing a Subdocument from a Master Document

Just as you can add subdocuments to a master document, you can remove them. Doing so is relatively easy, and it doesn't ...

Discover More

Wrapping Your Text

Want to see all the text that is in a cell, even if it is quite a bit? You need to make sure that text wrapping is turned on, ...

Discover More

Meaningless Text

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog, or so the story goes. Here's how to put this type of meaningless text into a ...

Discover More

Solve Real Business Problems Master business modeling and analysis techniques with Excel and transform data into bottom-line results. This hands-on, scenario-focused guide shows you how to use the latest Excel tools to integrate data from multiple tables. Check out Microsoft Excel 2013 Data Analysis and Business Modeling today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

Changing the Percent Symbol

Some symbols can be easily changed in Excel or in Windows, such as the symbols used for currency and to separate thousands in ...

Discover More

Using Strikethrough Formatting

Need a line through the middle of your text? Use strikethrough formatting, which is easy to apply using the Format Cells ...

Discover More

Converting Forced Text to Numbers

If you have some numbers stored in cells that are formatted as text, you may get some surprises when you try to use those ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share