Inserting a Row or Column

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 21, 2018)

2

Inserting a blank row or column in your worksheet (between two rows or columns currently in use) is very easy in Excel. All you need to do is select the row or column that you want the new row or column to appear before. You then need to choose Columns from the Insert menu (to insert a column) or Rows from the Insert menu (to insert a row). Excel adjusts your worksheet so the new column or row appears as directed.

If you prefer to not use the menus or the mouse, you can use a keyboard shortcut to insert a row or column. All you need to do is select the row or column that you want the new row or column to appear before. Then, press Ctrl++ (that's Ctrl and the plus sign at the same time). Excel adjusts your worksheet so the new column or row appears as directed.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (1926) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is one less than 3?

2018-07-23 13:58:48

Ray Austin

In my XL 2003 "Alt Insert Row or Col "works fine
but nothing happens with "Control ++"

??


2018-07-21 14:23:56

Richard Wood

I'm surprised you didn't suggest adding the insert row and column icons to the main toolbar. I find it really handy to have them right in front of me whenever I want (which is pretty often). The insert row tool in particular is one that I probably use more than just about any other. They also really simplify moving or copying rows to new locations as well.

Love your tips. Keep up the great work.
Woody


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