Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Diagonal Borders in a Conditional Format.

Diagonal Borders in a Conditional Format

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 9, 2016)

1

Parin likes using the diagonal border on some cells to show the value as "crossed out." She would like to use diagonal borders in a conditional format, however. When she tries, she can set other types of borders, but not a diagonal border—it is not selectable in the conditional format. She wonders if there is a way to use diagonal borders with conditional formats.

There is no direct way to do this when setting up a conditional format—Excel simply won't allow you to use diagonal borders with a conditional format. That means that you may want to look for and use an acceptable workaround. Here are a few ideas for the conditional format:

  • Set the conditional format to use a font color that is the same as cell background color. That way the contents will seem to disappear if your condition is met.
  • Set the conditional format to use one of the cell patterns. There a some that look like multiple diagonal lines through the cell.
  • Set the conditional format to use strikethrough formatting for any text that appears in the cell.

If you actually want to use the diagonal borders, then the only way to do it is to apply an explicit format to the cell and not rely on a conditional format. This can be done through the use of a macro, such as the following:

Private Sub Worksheet_Change(ByVal Target As Range)
    Dim c As Variant
    Dim addr As String

    Set Target = Range("C12:C20")

    If Intersect(Target, ActiveCell) Is Nothing Then Exit Sub
    For Each c In Target
        If c = 0 And Len(c) <> 0 Then
            addr = c.Address
            With Range(addr).Borders(xlDiagonalUp)
                .LineStyle = xlContinuous
            End With
        ElseIf c > 0 And Len(c) > 0 Then
            addr = ActiveCell.Address
            With Range(addr).Borders(xlDiagonalUp)
                .LineStyle = xlNone
            End With
        End If
    Next
End Sub

You should right-click on a worksheet tab, display the code window from the resulting Context menu, and then paste this macro into the code window. The macro is executed any time a cell is changed in the worksheet. It checks the cells in C12:C20, and if any of them contain a zero value, then the diagonal border is set for that cell.

You can easily change the macro to apply to a different range of cells or to check for a different condition when applying the borders. If you prefer, you can change the xlDiagonalUp constant to xlDiagonalDown, depending on which diagonal border you want applied.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (10692) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Diagonal Borders in a Conditional Format.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Stubborn Phantom Paragraphs

When converting documents from WordPerfect to Word, you may run into a problem with what the conversion produces. If you have ...

Discover More

Setting Default Options for Track Changes

The Track changes feature in Word is a great help in editing documents, particularly if you are working with others or your ...

Discover More

Editing Custom Dictionaries

Custom dictionaries can be great, but they take quite a bit of time to create. Word provides a way you can edit your custom ...

Discover More

Save Time and Supercharge Excel! Automate virtually any routine task and save yourself hours, days, maybe even weeks. Then, learn how to make Excel do things you thought were simply impossible! Mastering advanced Excel macros has never been easier. Check out Excel 2010 VBA and Macros today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Shading a Cell Until Something is Entered

Conditional formatting provides the opportunity to get very creative with your formatting. One such creative urge can be ...

Discover More

Understanding Conditional Formatting Conditions

Conditional formatting can be a great way to highlight specific information in your worksheets. This tip explains the ...

Discover More

Conditional Format that Checks for Data Type

Conditional formatting can be used to highlight cells that contain the improper type of data for your needs. This tip ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 8Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 7 - 0?

2016-08-04 14:23:08

Carol Terrell

Please help.
This is a question related to the Format.
Can you have different size data in the spread sheet on the same row?
Example;
I have sales data from Jan to Dec for 2016, 2015 & 2014 on the first half of my excel workbook across the top.
Now I want to have different months and years with different data under this data using the same cell rows as the top but these cells I need in a different size than the top cells but still on the same rows.
Is that possible? Can I format the bottom to any size within that row and still have it all on the same row and be able to change fronts, etc. without adjusting the top row? Please email me an answer.
Thank You.


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.