Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Finding the Address of the Lowest Value in a Range.

Finding the Address of the Lowest Value in a Range

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 5, 2013)

When writing a macro, you can find the lowest value in a range of cells by using the WorksheetFunction method to apply the MIN worksheet function. You may need, however, to not only find the lowest value in the range, but also the address of the first cell that contains that value.

One simple way is to simply step through the range you want to examine and derive both the lowest value and the address of the cell being examined, as in the following:

Function FindLowestAddr(pRng As Range) As String
    Application.Volatile
    MinVal = pRng.Cells(1).Value
    MinAddr = pRng.Cells(1).Address
    For Each c in pRng
        If c.Value < MinVal Then
            MinVal = c.Value
            MinAddr = c.Address
        End If
    Next c
    FindLowestAddr = MinAddr
End Function

Note that this approach doesn't rely upon the MIN worksheet function at all. There is a drawback to it, however—it doesn't differentiate between cells that contain numeric values and those that don't. In other words, if the range passed to the function contains a blank cell, that cell is considered to contain a zero value, which may very well be the lowest value in the range.

One way around this is to rely upon worksheet functions from within the macro. The following macro uses both the MIN and MATCH worksheet functions to determine the location of the minimum value and then the index (offset) of that cell within the range.

Function GetAddr(rng As Range) As String
    Dim dMin As Double
    Dim lIndex As Long
    Dim sAddress As String

    Application.Volatile
    With Application.WorksheetFunction
        dMin = .Min(rng)
        lIndex = .Match(dMin, rng, 0)
    End With
    GetAddr = rng.Cells(lIndex).Address
End Function

It should be noted that if you are using the macro only to discover the address because you figured there was no way to derive the desired information without the macro, then you can do away with the macro entirely by using a worksheet formula. For instance, if you want to determine the address of the lowest-valued cell in the named range MyRange, you could use the following:

=ADDRESS(ROW(MyRange)+MATCH(MIN(MyRange),MyRange,0)-1,COLUMN(MyRange))

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7140) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Finding the Address of the Lowest Value in a Range.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Applying Formatting in Lists

If you want to change the formatting applied to numbers or bullets in your lists, you'll appreciate the information in this ...

Discover More

Hiding and Unhiding Rows

When building a worksheet, you may need to hide some of the rows or unhide other, previously hidden, rows. It's easy to do; ...

Discover More

Selecting Text in Linked Text Boxes

Text boxes are often used as design elements in a document layout. If you have linked text boxes, you may have noticed that ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

Getting a Count of Unique Names

When you've got a column full of names, you may want to get a count of how many of those names are unique. You can make quick ...

Discover More

Determining "Highest Since" or "Lowest Since"

When compiling statistics on a collection of data points, you may want to know whether a particular value is the "highest ...

Discover More

Starting Out Formulas

When you enter a formula from the keyboard, Excel only knows it is a formula if you start it with an equal sign. You can also ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share