Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Tying a Hyperlink to a Specific Cell.

Tying a Hyperlink to a Specific Cell

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 3, 2016)

3

Manoj created a hyperlink between two worksheets by using copy and paste hyperlink command (the hyperlink targets a specific cell). Later he inserted some rows on the target worksheet that caused the target cell to move down a bit. Even though the target cell moves down, the hyperlink continues to reference the old cell location. Manoj is wondering if there is a way to make sure that the hyperlink always targets the cell he intended when creating the link.

In Excel, hyperlink addresses are essentially text that references a cell. Formulas in Excel link to cell references which adjust when changes in the worksheet structure are made (inserting and deleting rows and columns, etc.). Hyperlink addresses, being text instead of cell references, will not adjust with such changes.

The solution is to create a named range that refers to the target cell you want used in the hyperlink. (You do this by choosing Insert | Name | Define.) When you create your hyperlink, you can then reference this named range in the Insert Hyperlink dialog box. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. The Insert Hyperlink dialog box.

At the left of the dialog box, click Place In This Document. You'll then see a list of named ranges in your workbook and you can choose which one you want to be associated with this hyperlink. In this way, you allow Excel to take care of translating between the name and the address for that name, which means that the hyperlink will always point to the cell you want it to point to.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3466) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Tying a Hyperlink to a Specific Cell.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is four more than 2?

2019-01-02 19:17:09

DAC

This was very helpful. Thank you.


2017-04-29 07:45:48

Brian Canes

Use the HYPERLINK function.
Regards
Brian


2017-04-28 03:35:36

Laurence

Indeed, I use this functionality.
Problem is that, even if I specify "A1", it seems it is transformed in "$A$1" (at least, it's what I see when I use the function "Define name" for the hyperlink. This explains why I have troubles when inserting or reordering lines, because the cell line mentioned in the hyperlink is "locked".
Isn't there a way that it takes into account what I mention in the "type the cell reference ", I mean : "§A1" only locks column A, but not the line, while "§A§1" would lock both line & colum ?
Thanks !


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