Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Hiding Columns Not within a Date Range.

Hiding Columns Not within a Date Range

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 30, 2015)

Jason has a worksheet that contains several columns, each of which represent a fiscal week for his company. These fiscal weeks begin with column G, with column H being the second fiscal week, column I being the third week, and so forth. Jason would like to create a macro that, when run, would look at today's date, calculate the fiscal week based on that date, and then hide any of the fiscal-week columns that are not within a specified range.

For the purposes of providing an answer, I'm going to assume that the range you want displayed will be equal to the 13 weeks (one quarter) immediately preceding the current fiscal week. With this in mind, there are a couple of things that must be done by the macro. First, it must determine what fiscal week it currently is. Then, it must hide all weeks not in the 13 weeks prior to this current fiscal week and unhide all those that are.

This is all relatively easy to do, with the exception of figuring out which fiscal week it currently is. The method of determining fiscal weeks can vary wildly from company to company. For simplicity's sake, however, I'm going to assume that the determination is fairly straightforward: divide the day of the year by seven and see what we have.

The following macro implements the approach discussed so far.

Sub HideWeeks()
    Dim BeginYear As Date           'start of fiscal year date
    Dim FirstWeekCol As Integer     'first fiscal week column
    Dim FirstShowWkCol As Integer   'first column to show
    Dim CurrWkCol As Integer        'current week column
    Dim J As Integer

    BeginYear = Cells(1, 1).Value
    FirstWeekCol = 7  'fiscal weeks begin with Col 7 (G)

    'Calculate Column of the current fiscal week
    CurrWkCol = ((Date - BeginYear) \ 7) + FirstWeekCol - 1
    'Calculate column of the first week to show
    FirstShowWkCol = CurrWkCol - 14
    If FirstShowWkCol < FirstWeekCol Then
        FirstShowWkCol = FirstWeekCol
    End If

    Application.ScreenUpdating = False

    'Unhide all columns
    Columns("G:IV").Hidden = False  'Unhide all week Columns

    'Hide week column before the rolling quarter
    For J = FirstWeekCol To FirstShowWkCol
        Columns(J).Hidden = True
    Next J

    'Hide week column after current week
    For J = CurrWkCol + 1 To 256
        Columns(J).Hidden = True
    Next intCol

    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
End Sub

Note that there is one value that must be grabbed from the worksheet in this macro: the last day of the prior year. It is assumed that this is in cell A1, and it is grabbed and placed in the BeginYear variable. This value is used to determine the day of the current year.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3261) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Hiding Columns Not within a Date Range.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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