Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Using SUM In a Macro.

Using SUM In a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 3, 2015)

Bob has a need to use the SUM function in a macro in order to find the sum of all the values in a column. The problem is that the number of cells to be summed will vary; for one run of the macro it could be 100 cells, while on the next it could be 300 and on the third only 25.

First, it is easy to use most worksheet functions (such as SUM) from within a macro. All you need to do is to preface the function name with "Application.WorksheetFunction." or simply "WorksheetFunction." Thus, if you know that each run of the macro will require summing A1:A100, then A1:A300, and finally A1:A25, you could use a macro like this:

Public Sub Sum_Demo()
    Dim myRange
    Dim Results
    Dim Run As Long

    For Run = 1 To 3
        Select Case Run
        Case 1
            myRange = Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("A1", "A100")
        Case 2
            myRange = Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("A1", "A300")
        Case 3
            myRange = Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("A1", "A25")
        End Select
        Results = WorksheetFunction.Sum(myRange)
        Range("B" & Run) = Results
    Next Run
End Sub

This macro uses a For . . . Next loop to specify different ranges of cells to be summed. It then uses the SUM worksheet function to assign the sum to the Results variable, which is (finally) stuffed into a cell in column B. The results of the first run are put in B1, the second in B2, and the third in B3.

While this particular macro may not be that useful, it shows several helpful techniques, such as how to define a named range, how to use the SUM function, and how to stuff the sum into a cell. What the macro doesn't do is to show how to select a variable number of cells to be summed. To do this, it is best to rely upon the End method of the Range object. The following code line shows how you can stuff the sum of the range starting at A1 and extending to just before the first blank cell in the column:

myRange = ActiveSheet.Range("A1", Range("A1").End(xlDown))
Range("B1") = WorksheetFunction.Sum(myRange)

Note that a range (myRange) is defined as beginning with A1 and extending through whatever the End method returns. This is then summed and stuffed into B1.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3217) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Using SUM In a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Changing Error Checking Rules

Excel can check the data and formulas in your worksheet to see if it detects any errors. The rules used for this checking can ...

Discover More

Referencing a Worksheet Name

Excel provides ways to reference the column or row number of a cell, but it doesn't provide a built-in way to reference a ...

Discover More

Formatting E-mail using AutoFormat

If you copy the text of an e-mail message to a Word document, you may notice that the formatting of the text leaves a lot to ...

Discover More

Solve Real Business Problems Master business modeling and analysis techniques with Excel and transform data into bottom-line results. This hands-on, scenario-focused guide shows you how to use the latest Excel tools to integrate data from multiple tables. Check out Microsoft Excel 2013 Data Analysis and Business Modeling today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

Documenting Changes in VBA Code

Your company may be regulated by requirements that it document any changes to the macros in an Excel worksheet. Your options ...

Discover More

Disabled Macros

Do your macros seem to be disabled on your new machine? It could be because of the security settings in Excel. Here's where ...

Discover More

Determining if Calculation is Necessary

When processing a worksheet with a macro, it may be helpful to periodically recalculate the worksheet. Wouldn't it be nice if ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share