Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Using Named Ranges in a Macro.

Using Named Ranges in a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 6, 2018)

1

Bruce has a named range (Account) defined in a workbook and he wonders how to access and use that named range from within a macro. There are several ways you can access the range, using either the Range object or the Names collection.

To access the named range using the Range object, all you need to do is provide the name of the range as a parameter to the object. This name is the same one that you defined within Excel. For instance, the following line could be used to change the interior color of the entire range:

Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("Account").Interior.Color = vbYellow

Note that the Range object is used relative to a particular worksheet, in this case Sheet1. You could also define a range object within VBA and then assign it to be equal to the named range, in this manner:

Set rng = Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("Account")

The other method of using the named range is to use the Names collection. The following line will again set the interior color of the range to yellow:

Workbooks("Book1.xls").Names("Account").RefersToRange.Interior.Color = vbYellow

Note that the Names collection is relative to the entire workbook, so it is not necessary to know which worksheet the named range is associated with when you use this method of access. You can also define a range object in VBA and assign it to be the same as the named range:

Set rng = Workbooks("Book1.xls").Names("Account").RefersToRange

You should know that the Names collection method of accessing a named range will only be viable if you don't have the same named range defined on different worksheets in the workbook. If you do, then you will need to use the Range object method, which requires the use of a specific worksheet name in the reference.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3106) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Using Named Ranges in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 5 + 3?

2018-02-25 19:45:35

Mike

I have a VBA code written to expand multiple groups of rows depending on if one of three selections is selected yes. I currently have the worksheet setup with 10 blank rows to expand if the yes option is selected, but want the ability to add rows if more data rows are needed beyond ten. The current code only references Rows to hide(i.e. 9:18) so if i insert another row, the code wont expand or collapse it and would mess up the ranges of the rows lower in the worksheet.

It seems like referencing a named range would work as the code wouldn't be looking for a range of row numbers, but rather a defined named range which would allow for rows to be inserted and dynamically update. I tried various inputs of the named range wording but keep getting an error in the coding. Can you let me know what the proper coding would be to reference the named range "SurveyMapping"? Code Section with attempted named range and a section with row number references Below:

If Not Intersect(Target, Range("$A1:ZZ100")) Is Nothing Then

If Range("b51").Value = "Yes" Then
Range("[Market Analysis Tool-2018-02-25.xlsm]!SurveyMapping").EntireRow.Hidden = False
ElseIf Range("c51").Value = "Yes" Then
Range("[Market Analysis Tool-2018-02-25.xlsm]!SurveyMapping").EntireRow.Hidden = False
ElseIf Range("d51").Value = "Yes" Then
Range("[Market Analysis Tool-2018-02-25.xlsm]!SurveyMapping").EntireRow.Hidden = False
Else
Range("[Market Analysis Tool-2018-02-25.xlsm!]SurveyMapping").EntireRow.Hidden = True
End If

End If

If Not Intersect(Target, Range("$A1:ZZ100")) Is Nothing Then

If Range("b64").Value = "Yes" Then
Rows("65:74").EntireRow.Hidden = False
ElseIf Range("c64").Value = "Yes" Then
Rows("65:74").EntireRow.Hidden = False
ElseIf Range("d64").Value = "Yes" Then
Rows("65:74").EntireRow.Hidden = False
Else
Rows("65:74").EntireRow.Hidden = True
End If

End If


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