Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Excel Charts in PowerPoint.

Excel Charts in PowerPoint

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 17, 2016)

6

If you do a lot of presentations, you may deal with many large data reports that include charts and graphs that summarize data for your audiences. Sometimes you may need to add these charts and graphs to PowerPoint presentations.

The problem with doing a simple copy and paste of a chart from Excel to PowerPoint is that although you only see the chart in the PowerPoint slide, the entire workbook is copied into PowerPoint as well. If someone double-clicks the chart in the slide, PowerPoint will open the entire Excel workbook.

This poses a couple of problems. First, unless the PowerPoint file has been password protected (not really an option for mass distribution) a user could easily adjust the data feeding into the chart and corrupt accuracy.

Secondly, since the entire Excel workbook is copied into the PowerPoint file, this can dramatically increase the total size on the PowerPoint file, possibly making it too cumbersome for distribution.

One simple solution is to modify how the pasting into PowerPoint is done. Follow these steps:

  1. In Excel, copy the chart as you normally would. (For instance, select the chart and press Ctrl+C.)
  2. In PowerPoint, display the slide where you want the chart to appear.
  3. Choose the Paste Special option from the Edit menu. PowerPoint displays the Paste Special dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Paste Special dialog box in PowerPoint.

  5. Select the Picture option.
  6. Click OK.

This time, only the image of the chart is pasted into the slide. This maintains the accuracy and security of your chart and significantly reduces the size of your PowerPoint presentation.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2882) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Excel Charts in PowerPoint.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

How Word Applies Styles

Styles are a great boon for applying styles in a powerfully consistent manner. How Word applies styles, however, depends on ...

Discover More

Retrieving Worksheet Names

Want to grab the names of all the worksheets in a workbook? Here's how you can stuff all those names into the cells of a ...

Discover More

Aligning Plus/Minus Symbols

Scientific writing often involves the use of special symbols, such as the plus/minus symbol. If you want to align these ...

Discover More

Excel Smarts for Beginners! Featuring the friendly and trusted For Dummies style, this popular guide shows beginners how to get up and running with Excel while also helping more experienced users get comfortable with the newest features. Check out Excel 2013 For Dummies today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Snapshots of Excel Worksheets for PowerPoint

If you need to get lots of information from Excel to PowerPoint, the task can be daunting. This tip explains different ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 8Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is eight minus 3?

2016-07-29 16:28:06

Paul Miner

Is there any way to copy an entire worksheet into the slide and then have scrollbars to allow moving around the sheet? supposedly this was possible in PPT 2010 but their method doesn't work in PPT 2016


2016-02-13 08:54:56

Davdi

Hi,

I've successfully created presentations using Enhanced Metafile, but when I switched to office 2013, the tables from Excel are now much larger requiring a resize.

What is the best way to manage this?

Thanks!


2015-11-25 16:44:00

Wams

Hello,
I need serious help with the following: I hope that my explanation is clear to the readers. I open a PPTX from VBA and via a loop, based on the number of slides found in the PPTX, I copy the slide and past it into a specific sheet, “MM Report”. What is happening is that the paste does not display the slide just copied. If I insert a breakpoint just after the paste, the pasted slide in Excel sheet is displayed. Without the breakpoint, the code loops to the last slide and displays only the last slide. I have look through the web at many different forums and have not found a solution. I want to have each pasted slide displayed, with a wait time in between. Here if the code:
Dim shp As Shape
Dim sSlide As Slide
Dim PPT As PowerPoint.Application
Set PPT = New PowerPoint.Application
PPT.Presentations.Open Filename:="C:TestPPT.pptx"
PPT.Visible = True

' Minimize the PPT and hide it from the background
PPT.WindowState = ppWindowMinimized

For i = 1 To PPT.ActivePresentation.Slides.Count
' Clear everything from the sheet/tab (MM Report)
Windows("ACTIVITIES DASHBOARD.xlsm").Activate
Sheets("MM Report").Select

' Clear the sheet/tab
For Each shp In ActiveSheet.Shapes
shp.Delete
Next shp

' Create the label for the page display of MM PPT slide
labelString = " MM MODEL STATUS REPORT FOR THE WEEK # " _
& Trim(Str(iNumberOfTheWeek)) & " AND SLIDE # " & Trim(Str(i))
' Write the Slide # from the PPT for display
Sheets("MM Report").Range("C24") = labelString

' Copy the current slide number "i" from the PPT
PPT.ActivePresentation.Slides.Range(Array(i)).Copy

‘ Paste Special in Enhanced Metafile format for clarity at location B2
Range("B2").Select
ActiveSheet.PasteSpecial Format:="Picture (Enhanced Metafile)", Link:=False _
, DisplayAsIcon:=False

‘ Resize the pasted slide in the spreadsheet
Selection.ShapeRange.IncrementLeft 47.8846456693
Selection.ShapeRange.IncrementTop 10.9615748031
‘##### HERE, IT SHOULD DISPLAY THE RECENTLY PASTED SLIDE ON THE SPREADSHEET SHEET.
‘##### HOWEVER, IT DOES NOT, EXCEPT FOR THE LAST SLIDE. A BREAKPOINT HERE DOES DISPLAY
‘##### THE RECENTLY COPY/PASTED SLIDE ON THE SPREADSHEET SHEET DURING EACH LOOP.

' Set delay timer
Application.Wait (Now + TimeValue("0:00:5"))

Next i


2015-04-08 14:26:43

Mohammad Afdal

Besides PowerPoint file size issue, there is another,bigger, problem with PowerPoint coping the workbook.
If you have multiple charts in your workbook, PowerPoint copies the whole workbook multiple times; One copy per chart. Each workbook is kept separate and thus you have multiple versions, in PowerPoint, and each version gets out of sync with others with a single update. A total mess.


2013-10-08 15:06:07

Tina

You saved my file size issue, thank you!

Did not realize when you copy/paste graphs into PowerPoint it actually pulls in the Excel workbook as well. I followed your recommendations and it worked like a charm.

Thank you


2013-06-17 10:05:14

Helen

But there are 2 "picture" options - what is the difference in the two? (What are pros/cons of each?)


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.