Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Printing Multiple Selections.

Printing Multiple Selections

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 13, 2012)

You may have a need at times to print out a group of selections from different worksheets and have them appear on a single sheet of paper. Perhaps the easiest way to do this is to simply set up a "consolidation" worksheet that you would actually use for your printing. Follow these general directions:

  1. Create a new worksheet to be used for consolidation/printing.
  2. Select the range on the worksheet that you wish to print.
  3. Press Ctrl+C to copy the selection.
  4. Go to the new sheet and select the cell where you want the information to appear.
  5. Choose Paste Special form the Edit menu. Excel displays the Paste Special dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  6. Figure 1. The Paste Special dialog box.

  7. Click on Paste Link. The dialog box disappears and the linked information appears in the worksheet.
  8. Repeat steps 2 through 6 for any other ranges you want included on the printout.
  9. Print the worksheet with the consolidated information.

The one big drawback to this approach is that if the worksheets from which you are copying have radically different formatting, you may not be able to merge them into a consolidated worksheet satisfactorily. (You will need to adjust the formatting in the consolidation sheet after pasting the different ranges.) In this case you may need to adjust formatting to get exactly the effect you desire.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2845) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Printing Multiple Selections.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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