Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Setting Column Width in a Macro.

Setting Column Width in a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 17, 2015)

It is not unusual to use macros to process data and format output in an workbook. If you use macros to do this type of work, you may be interested in changing the width of a column using a macro. If so, you should pay attention to the ColumnWidth property. This property, when applied to a Column object, indicates the width of the column in characters, based on the current font settings.

For instance, the following code snippet steps through the columns in a selection and sets the width of each column to 10 characters:

For Each c In ActiveWindow.RangeSelection.Columns
    c.ColumnWidth = 10
Next c

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2558) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Setting Column Width in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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