Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Searching for Wildcards.

Searching for Wildcards

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 27, 2013)

4

You know that you can use Excel's Find and Replace feature to locate information in your workbooks. (Just press Ctrl+F or Ctrl+H to pull up the dialog box.) You may even know that you can use question marks (?) and asterisks (*) as wildcard characters, just as you would at a DOS command prompt. What if you want to search for a cell that actually contains an asterisk or a question mark, however?

Excel allows you to search for special characters by preceding the character with the tilde (~). In other words, if you want to search for an asterisk, you would actually search for ~*. If you wanted to search for the question mark, you would search for ~? instead.

Finally, if you wanted to search for the tilde character, you would actually search for ~~. In each instance, the leading tilde informs Excel that the following character should be translated as an actual character, and not as a special wildcard character.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2333) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Searching for Wildcards.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is eight minus 8?

2015-10-15 13:45:48

Adalberto

YongBoo,

You can try a macro for search and replace (or remove) any cell containning chars with ascii value greater than, for example, 167.

Public Function cuttrash(r As Range)
lr = Len(r.Value)
For c = 1 To lr
at = Asc(Mid$(r.Value, c, 1))
If at > 165 Then
cuttrash = ""
Exit Function
End If
Next
cuttrash = r.Value
End Function


2014-11-24 12:47:30

Jiehan

In response to yongboo:

Find ~*, and replace with nothing.


2014-08-16 09:22:29

PhilP

@ yongboo

Ctrl-H to Find & Replace.

In Find What box enter ~*???? (with ? for each character after * you wish to remove - if you put more than you need then no problem)

Leave Replace With box empty

Hit Replace ALL


2014-08-15 14:16:12

yongboo

I'm a teacher working on some language data on Excel. I'm trying to remove every occurrence of texts followed by '*'. For example, I have multiple cells that are like this.

출연하다
*나오다

So I'm trying to get rid of '*나오다' from this particular cell, and other cells that have a similar combination. But the actual texts after '*' are different from cell to cell.

How do I do that?
Thank you so very much for any help!!


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