Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Rounding in Results.

Rounding in Results

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 7, 2015)

Melissa was having a hard time understanding why Excel displays certain numbers in certain ways. She provided, as an example, the following steps:

  1. Start with a new, blank worksheet.
  2. In cell B2, enter 33.33333333.
  3. In cell B3, enter 33.333333333 (one more digit than in step 2).
  4. In cell C2, enter =B2*3.
  5. In cell C3, enter =B3*3.

When Melissa would do this, cell C2 would display the result as 99.99999999, and cell C3 would display the result as 100.

To see why Excel does this, there are a few things you have to understand. First of all, when you create a new worksheet, all the cells are formatted using the General format. Using this format, information is displayed in a general manner (thus the format name). In this format, numbers are displayed using up to ten digits. It doesn't matter whether the digits are to the left or right of the decimal place; only a maximum of ten are displayed.

What happens if the number that you are entering has more than ten digits, or if the result of a formula has more than ten digits? Then Excel rounds the number so that no more than ten digits are displayed. Thus, 99.99999999 is displayed, but if you add one more digit, the rounded result is 100. Rest assured, however, that Excel continues to maintain the cell contents with fifteen digits of accuracy, even though fewer digits are displayed.

If the number you are entering contains nothing to the right of the decimal point, but there are more than ten digits in the number, then the General format results in the number being displayed using scientific notation.

There is one caveat to the above: if the General-formatted cell into which the value is placed is narrower than what is required to display the full number, then the value is rounded so that it can be displayed within the available column width. If you later adjust the column width so it is wider, then the number is reformatted so it is displayed with up to ten digits.

If you want to use more than ten digits to display your number, you need to explicitly format the cell. Either click on the Increase Decimal tool on the Formatting toolbar, or choose Format | Cells and use the Number tab to control how the displayed number should be formatted.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2328) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Rounding in Results.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Understanding Auditing

Excel provides some great tools that can help you see the relationships between the formulas in your worksheets. These are ...

Discover More

Controlling Entry Order on Unprotected Cells

When you protect a worksheet, one of the benefits is that you can limit which cells can be used for data entry. How a user ...

Discover More

Selecting Drawing Objects

Excel allows you to create all sorts of drawings using a wide assortment of tools. When you need to take an action upon those ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Rounding to the Nearest Half Dollar

When working with financial data, it's easy to round values to the nearest dollar. What if you want them rounded to the ...

Discover More

Rounding To the Nearest Even Integer

Do you need your numbers to be rounded to an even integer value? How you accomplish the task depends on the nature of the ...

Discover More

Rounding to Two Significant Digits

Excel provides a variety of functions you can use to round values in any number of ways. It does not, however, provide a way ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 8Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is three more than 5?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.